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Textiles & Machinery


Trends: a survey of interzum 2015 exhibitors


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interzum exhibitors were asked about important emerging trends and new initiatives they would be presenting at the event. Here we find out what is important to the Textiles & Machinery sector.


This year around 460 exhibitors, 75% of who were from abroad, represented the entire spectrum of upholstered furniture production, mattress manufacture and the treatment and processing of upholstery fabrics and leather. In addition, the ‘Textile Production Line’ Piazza in Hall 10.1 drew the crowds in, enhancing the event with an exciting live area. “With this Production Line we are showing that we don’t just offer our visitors a perfect presentation of products, we also want to turn the fair into an experience,” says Project Manager, Matthias Pollmann. “This is a successful example of both products and solutions being presented in a practical manner.”


In answer to the question on the most important current trends for the industry, several companies provided a glimpse into their plans for interzum. Expert Systemtechnik, for example, identified the significant trend for upholstered furniture production in cross-system networking of production processes. At the event the company demonstrated that this technology does not always entail investment in new products or systems: “By replacing out-dated hardware components and the associated software with specially developed interfaces, older cutting systems can be updated to the current state-of-the-art in technology, and continue to be used,” says Sebastian Bruder, Managing Director of Systemtechnik.


Integrated process solutions are an important topic for Lectra too and they are seeing a trend lately in the leather industry for


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