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2nd PLACE


TT Aerospace Portable Bearing Press


PROBLEM: The tail rotor driveshaft support bearings on the AS-350,


EC-130, and other Airbus Helicopter models are very diffi cult to move, especially when new. Mechanics use tools inadequately designed to do the job, homemade contraptions, and magic potions made of soap to help the rubber liner slide on the driveshaft. No simple solution existed ... until now.


SOLUTION: The TT Aerospace Portable Bearing Press is a hydraulic unit that can clamp onto the shaft to adjust the bearings position, or just break them loose from a stuck condition. It requires no tools to install and is fully self-contained. It allows precise controlled movement, and what once took hours to do can now be done in 15 minutes. Two years were devoted to R&D and the patent process and the fi rst production units were delivered this past February.


TT Aerospace and the Portable Bearing Press is the innovation of Travis Taylor, a helicopter pilot in Las Vegas. Prior to becoming a pilot, he was an aerospace toolmaker for 15 years. This project merges his two careers.


www.ttaerospace.com


3rd PLACE


sHeli-Port Portable Helicopter Storage


WHAT IT IS: sHeli-Port is a “violin case” for helicopters; a patented, hydraulic-powered clamshell fi berglass case designed to secure a helicopter from tampering, weather, and hangar rash. Put it anywhere: the airport, backyard, or even on the yacht. It even doubles as a shipping case.


HOW IT WORKS: Pilots simply land on one of three available confi gurations into the open sHeli-Port. Once the aircraft is shut down and secured, simply fl ip a switch that activates the solar battery-powered hydraulic system that closes the clamshell and leaves the helicopter safe and secure.


WHY IT’S INNOVATIVE: sHeli-Port will revolutionize how helicopters are stored, bringing safety, security, and immediate cost savings by eliminating:


• Hangar Rash (Blades are expensive!) • Ground handling equipment (simply land and close) • •


• Wasted hangar rent


The sHeli-Port is wind tunnel tested up to 100 mph. www.sheli-port.com


WATCH VIDEO NOW


Confi gurable for multiple helicopter types, the system consists of 14.1-inch high resolution multi-function displays that off er pilots more information without clutter or confusion.


4th PLACE


Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion® Systems


Integrated The Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion® Avionics integrated


avionics systems is an advanced cockpit system that brings unparalleled situational awareness and ease-of-use to the helicopter cockpit.


Featuring an intuitive graphical interface and easily confi gurable display windows, Pro Line Fusion increases “heads up, eyes out” time for the pilot by presenting the right information at the right time, reducing the need for pilots to search through complicated menus to obtain critical fl ight information. The system also off ers an industry-fi rst “touch what you want to change” interactive touch-screen control on all fl ight displays, instead of just one or two control panels. Whether it’s tuning a radio or modifying a fl ight plan, most pilot tasks can be


completed with two or three taps directly on the screen displaying the setting the pilot wishes to change.


For safe operations in all visual conditions, the system features software-embedded and fully integrated HTAWS and HSVS with the highest terrain resolution on the market today.


Pro Line Fusion truly represents the next generation of helicopter avionics ... but it’s available today.


Hangar construction issues (Check out the tax advantages.) Shared hangars (strangers around your helicopter)


www.rockwellcollins.com


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