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opportunity for flight crews to prevent an adverse outcome.


Recent Developments


Research into the field of human factors as it applies to CRM is ongoing and new initiatives continue to emerge. The integration of CRM into training and operations via clearly defined standard operating procedures represents a move towards the establishment of CRM processes, rather than simply awareness training. Many operators have recognized the importance of scenario-based training as an effective way of teaching CRM skills because it allows pilots to practice skills and receive valuable reinforcement.


In recent years, there has been more focus on decision-making during CRM training. This approach views effective decision- making as the most important indicator of flight crew success, and traditional CRM subjects are presented as processes that assist decision-making.


The U.K.’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) have established a series of stringent accreditation requirements for CRM Instructors (CRMIs)—which I have completed—and for CRM Instructor Examiners (CRMIEs). This accreditation process is designed to help ensure an acceptable standard of CRM instruction and evaluation, as individuals who receive this accreditation must meet a number of experience-related prerequisites, as well as demonstrate that they possess the necessary knowledge and skill to instruct or evaluate CRM before they are permitted to carry out those duties. In the U.K. and Europe the accreditation process also involves a renewal process every three years to ensure that previously qualified CRMIs and CRMIEs continue to meet the required standard. In the USA and Canada, there are no experience, training, or qualification requirements needed to teach CRM.


In my view, there should be. Fly safely!


Randy


Mains is an author,


public speaker, and an AMRM consultant who works in the helicopter industry after a long career of aviation adventure. He currently serves as chief CRM/AMRM instructor for Oregon Aero.


He may be contacted at: randym@oregonaero.com


rotorcraftpro.com


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