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military option. However, this was about to change. In 1950, the Army had 63 H-13s in its inventory. Then the Korean War broke out. Army appropriation funds increased         dollars, and by 1954 the Army had acquired more than 600 Bell H-13s for transporting troops and supplies.


The Army continued training its pilots in       Then in 1956, Army helicopter pilot training moved to Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas. Camp Wolters (eventually known as Fort Wolters) was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School from 1956 to 1973. The  in 1956 were 13 Bell H-13s from Edward Gary Air Force Base. By 1969, nearly 1,300 training helicopters were operating there, mixed among several manufacturers.


In addition to Fort Wolters, two additional helicopter pilot schools: Camp Rucker (changed to Fort Rucker 1955) and             designated the Attack Helicopter Training   whose purpose was to train pilots in the Bell AH-1G Cobra.


Fort Rucker (Alabama) introduced the Bell         1966. After primary training in a piston helicopter, Army helicopter pilots would        transition. Shortly after, the Aero-Scout track was established with the introduction of the Bell OH-58. Graduating helicopter pilots would either pilot a Bell UH-1 Huey or OH-58 Kiowa. Over the next few years, the Army completely phased out piston helicopters. In 1990, the Bell UH-1 Huey was the Army’s primary training helicopter. In 1993, the Army took bids for what it called       Helicopter was awarded the NTH contract, 


38 August 2015


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