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TravelVizcaya


Time for a Trip


Edited by Kate Wertheimer timeout.com/los-angeles/travel @kate_em_up


SPOTLIGHT ON… Miami


THIS SOUTHEASTERN CITY is more than just beaches, palm trees and mojitos—though there are plenty of those, too. Book a cross-country trip to check out the other always-sunny city for a Florida getaway that’s equal parts exotic and arty.


Salsa like a pro No wallflowers are welcome at Little Havana’s


Ball & Chain (1513 SW 8th St; 305-643-7820, ballandchainmiami.com), where wannabe Jazz Agers convene for dancing and boozing. Miami’s trendiest nightclub from 1935 through the late ’50s is cool again, charming crowds with roaring live musical performances and Tropicana-style dancers, who also sub as salsa instructors on Thursday nights.


Live the high life Lose yourself in all of the grandeur of Vizcaya (3251


S Miami Ave; 305-250-9133, vizcaya.org), the massive Italian Renaissance–style villa tucked away in the hippie Coconut Grove neighborhood. This seaside mansion, built for Chicago industrialist James Deering in the early 20th century, is a destination unto itself—equal parts museum, formal garden and historical site. Tour the 34 antique-decorated bedrooms, count the iconic black-and-white tiles, and bask in the glow of Biscayne Bay’s cerulean waters.


“For the most amazing massage of your life, head to Exhale Miami inside the EPIC Hotel.” —Marilyn


“Go to Sugar for incredible views and killer cocktails.” —Amber


“Watch the sun set


at the Deck at Island Gardens, but don’t valet. Free parking is around the bend!” —Jacqueline


69


INSIDER SECRETS


Locals give it to you straight.


Chow down in an up-and-coming ’hood Yes, Park West is full of 24-hour nightclubs, bars and


strip joints, but there’s even more here to whet your appetite. Perk up at badass barista Camila Ramos’s long-awaited café All Day (1035 N Miami Ave; 305- 699-3447, alldaymia.com). She keeps mum on the origins of her organic blend, but there’s no silencing customers who rave about it. Next door, Fooq’s (1035 N Miami Ave; 786-536-2749, fooqsmiami.com) is where David Foulquier serves his grandmother’s Persian recipes (like a pomegranate chicken and fragrant rosewater gelato). The space feels more Silver Lake than South Beach, complete with a tiny sidewalk courtyard and a Grateful Dead mural in the restroom.


Browse an outdoor urban museum Step through the large, wrought-iron gates of


Wynwood Walls (2516 NW Second Ave; 305-531- 4411, thewynwoodwalls.com) to find an outdoor museum for graffiti lovers. You’ll see frequently updated works by artists from more than 16 countries, including a mural by L.A.’s own Shepard Fairey, as well as work by New York City ’s PHASE 2, a pioneer of the “softie” bubble-letter–style writing.


Stroll through a waterfront neighborhood True pedestrian enclaves are few in Miami, but Sunset


Harbour’s walkable streets are only part of why this neighborhood is special. Get Zen at the yoga studio Green Monkey (1827 Purdy Ave; 305-397- 8566, greenmonkey.com), visit one of the city’s first gastropubs, Pubbelly (1418 20th St; 305-532-7555, pubbellyboys.com/pubbelly), and explore South Beach like a local. ■ Virginia Gil


FIND MORE ONLINE AT TIMEOUT.COM/MIAMI. October–December 2016 Time Out Los Angeles


PHOTOGRAPH: TOP: SHUTTERSTOCK


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