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Things to Do Edited by Michael Juliano timeout.com/los-angeles/things-to-do @mjuliano


Things to Do


To the rescue


These sanctuaries offer critters a second chance and humans a close encounter. By Michael Juliano


Animal Tracks


WHAT HAPPENS WHEN an orphaned sea lion pup is stranded on the shore? Or when animal actors reach the end of their careers? These wildlife sanctuaries in and around Los Angeles rescue and rehabilitate animals and sometimes reintroduce them into the wild— and welcome visitors, too. If you’ve ever wanted to pet a fennec fox or groom a baboon, set course for these sanctuaries tucked into mountain valleys and suburban backyards.


Wildlife Learning Center Walk around the leafy grounds of this


suburban Sylmar sanctuary to see everything from monkeys to foxes—and school trips and birthday parties. For hands- on photo ops, request a close encounter with a porcupine, a Siberian lynx, a two-toed sloth or an impossibly adorable fennec fox. Make sure to say hi to Zeus, the starry-eyed blind owl in the gift shop. à 16027 Yarnell St (818-362-8711, wildlifelearningcenter .org). Daily 11am–5pm; $9.


Time Out Los Angeles October–December 2016


Marine Mammal Care Center This San Pedro rehabilitation center scoops


up distressed marine mammals along the coast between Long Beach and Malibu in hopes of reintroducing them to the ocean. Though these stories can be sad—sudden blindness, a shark bite—the mood stays light thanks to a cordial crew of volunteers and a comical chorus of sea lion barks. Viewing is restricted to a sidewalk outside the fences—close enough to see the sweet faces of belly-flopping baby elephant seals. à 3601 S Gaffey St (310-548-5677, marinemammalcare.org). Open daylight hours daily, educational talks 10am–4pm; free.


Animal Tracks Where do animal actors go when they retire?


If they’re lucky, they get to go to this Agua Dulce backyard. Stacy Gunderson, a veteran Hollywood animal trainer, cares for injured or rejected exotic animals—like Jabba the


38 Wildlife Learning Center


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