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Los Angeles, we’re never going to leave you. Here’s why. By the Time Out Los Angeles editors


WE’RE SO IN love with Los Angeles. This city is equal parts laid-back and forward-thinking; people come (and stay) for that perfect mix of easy-breezy living and ambitious dream chasing. Whoever you are—artist, actor, rocket scientist, surfer—you can find your place and make your mark here. And whether the current national trend is to mock us or to move here in droves, we stay true (Dodgers) blue to L.A., because once you’re here, there’s so much to explore and so much to love. Here are some of our very favorite things about the city—the unique and lovely reasons that might just make you want to stick around forever too.


L.A. Forever Republique


everyone else.


We do brunch better than


Trois Familia Culinary trio Ludo Lefebvre, Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo have created a brunch haven in Silver Lake with Trois Familia. It’s both French and Mexican—you’re going to love the churro French toast. à 3510 Sunset Blvd (323-725-7800, troisfamilia.com)


Leona At Venice’s Leona, chef Nyesha Arrington pays homage to her multicultural heritage with unique mash-up dishes like the Korean latkes. à 123 Washington Blvd (310-822-5379, leonavenice.com)


@ericgarcetti


Our mayor’s Instagram account is better than yours. @ericgarcetti, you continue to kill it.


You can see a movie star perform stand-up for $8 on a Tuesday. L.A.’s legendary comedy clubs frequently host pop-ins from big-name stars, and comedians like Sarah Silverman, Tig Notaro and Pete Holmes take up regular residencies at Largo at the Coronet (366 N La Cienega Blvd; 310-855-0350, largo-la.com). But some smaller, hole-in-the-wall spots harbor top-notch talent for less than a Hamilton: You never know when Aziz Ansari or Zach Galifianakis might drop by Put Your Hands Together with Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher (Tuesdays, $5) at UCB Franklin (5919 Franklin Ave; franklin.ucbtheatre .com) or the Meltdown with Jonah Ray and Kumail Nanijani (Wednesdays, $8) at the NerdMelt Showroom (7522 Sunset Blvd; nerdmeltla.com).


We know how to relax, K-style.


Korean spas are a dime a dozen in L.A. We’ve adopted the cultural norm of spending hours (sometimes wee morning ones, as many spas


25


Sea Harbour Love dim sum? Sea Harbour offers made-to- order dishes like crystal shrimp dumplings to start your weekend off right. à 3939 Rosemead Blvd, Rosemead (626-288-3939)


Republique Republique’s stunning design is just as impressive as its pastries, shakshuka and kimchi fried rice. à 624 S La Brea Ave (310-362-6115, republiquela.com)


Nighthawk Breakfast Bar Brunch for dinner is a thing. Fuel up on spiked cereal milk and hangover food at Nighthawk Breakfast Bar after the sun’s gone down; a more traditional brunch is offered on weekends. à 417 Washington Blvd, Venice (nighthawkbb.com)


are open 24/7) sweating, soaking, napping and generally feeling pretty great—in our birthday suits more often than not.


We have a storied tiki culture.


Tiki arrived in L.A. in 1934, when Ernest Gantt opened Don the Beachcomber in Hollywood. The bar closed in 1985, but it spawned a huge interest in Polynesian culture across the U.S. and inspired L.A.’s oldest tiki bar, Tonga Hut (12808 Victory Blvd; 818-769-0708, tongahut.com). The North Hollywood dive opened in 1958 and is responsible for one of the city’s best mai tais.


October–December 2016 Time Out Los Angeles


PHOTOGRAPHS: TOP: JAKOB N. LAYMAN


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