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LAB FOCUS PHARMACEUTICAL LABS


PAIN POINTS OF


PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORIES


Paul-Deny Gouldson, Vice President of Strategic Solutions at research and development data management specialist IDBS, highlights the main problems with managing research in pharmaceutical laboratories and how to overcome them.


TAKING NOTE Scientists working in pharmaceutical laboratories regularly encounter a variety of hurdles that can hinder their research. Common hurdles include paper laboratory notebooks with poorly written entries, resulting in: data being interpreted badly, IP protection issues (which are magnified when collaborating with other organisations), and the process of creating, managing and executing new standard operating procedures


28 | Tomorrow’s Laboratories


(SOPs). But, there are solutions to these paper-driven issues. Pharmaceutical scientists can utilise technology to totally bypass these paper-based pain points to maximise their experiments’ value, whilst also protecting and improving the quality of their overall research.


Deciphering and analysing poorly written data in paper laboratory notebooks is an all-too-frequent challenge for scientists. Documenting research in laboratory notebooks


is a vital regulatory and legal responsibility for pharmaceutical organisations and a thorough laboratory will capture all activity. Surprisingly, many laboratories still rely on paper notebooks for record- keeping, and this documentation process can result in thousands of notebooks being created. As most laboratories operate with several scientists all contributing research and inputting data, they can easily experience data integrity issues.


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