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RETAIL & DAYTIME CLEANING


THINGS ARE LOOKING UP


Wandering around retail outlets and shopping centres, our attention is inevitably taken by the colourful window displays and bright signage. However, according to a company with a different view on our retail meccas, CAM Specialist Support, what goes on in the periphery is also vital to attract and retain customers. Sean Canty, Director at CAM, explains.


We would never get anything done if we had to consciously process everything that we see. For this reason our conscious minds concentrate on the most pressing issue or relevant point to help us get on with our daily lives; leaving the rest to our subconscious or to be ignored completely.


When we’re out shopping this means identifying the shop we want and the product within it. If it comes with a big ‘Sale’ sign attached, then all the better. However, just because we’re not consciously processing everything, it doesn’t mean our brains aren’t taking information in.


ACCUMULATING


INFORMATION If you were asked about the façade of a shopping centre, for instance, you might not immediately be able to call to mind what it looks like. The chances are though you’ll have a general impression. As time goes on, and the façade accumulates dirt and grime, the impression will become increasingly negative and could influence your choice of retail destination.


In our consumer-driven economy, every shopping centre is in competition with other retail outlets and high street shops to win attention, footfall and crucially, customers’ money. Ensuring people experience clean, useable and safe facilities can strongly influence the time and money customers spend in a retail environment and whether they come back.


A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE As experts in working at height, we’re very used to looking at things from a different perspective and noticing


70 | Tomorrow’s Cleaning April 2016


– and more importantly rectifying – the issues that may be negatively impacting shoppers’ perceptions, whether consciously or otherwise.


A large number of shopping centres are now getting to an age where they are showing signs of wear and tear. Façades have a build-up of dirt, glass atrium roofs are prone to unsightly and potentially hazardous leaks and signage is often discoloured. All of these issues combine to take the sheen off the shopping experience and risk retailers and customers going elsewhere with their business.


It is of course vital to ensure floors and low-level surfaces are clear and clean; it is not unreasonable for visitors to expect flooring to be kept spotless and any discarded litter or chewing gum to be quickly removed.


However, the retail environment needs to be looked at holistically if its appeal is to be maximised. That means also identifying areas above head height that can impact on our overall impressions of the cleanliness and well- maintained state of the environment.


STOP THE PIGEON With many shopping centres having extensive amounts of glass incorporated into their structures, one important high-level task is window cleaning. Smeared or stained windows can quickly undermine shoppers’ impressions of a retail centre.


This is far from the only task performed at height. Straightforward jobs such as hoovering and dusting need to be looked at in a whole new light when you step off the ground. Ledges and beams can accumulate


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