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During the run of the Saturday morning staple, SuperFriends, Wonder Woman sported a Marlo Thomas, That Girl flip doo and was the only female in the all-boys Justice League of America. She still retained the traditionalWonder Woman items needed for fighting good: Golden lasso, tiara, the bracelets and of course, that invisible jet. Who didn’t want one? She was also featured in a plethora of animated ventures:Wonder Woman and the Star Riders, Batman: The Brave and the Bold, DC Super Hero Girls and even an episode of South Park.


YOU SPIN ME ‘ROUND A five-minute pilot was proposed in 1967 forWho’s


Afraid of Diana Prince? by William Dozier. He’s the guy behind TV’sBatman, who thought it was time to bringWonder Woman to the small screen. Unfortunately, it was also decided that this Diana Prince (Ellie Wood Walker) would live at home with her shrill mother (Maudie Prickett) and transform into her super alter ego (Linda Harrison ofThe Planet of the Apes films) by entering a revolving wall and being able to fly afterwards. Dubya tee eff? The pilot was a poor attempt to capitalize on the success ofBatman and thankfully, never made it to a series. Cathy Lee Crosby starred as the titular hero in a


1974 TV movie, loosely based on the DC Comics character… And that is an understatement. Crosby is blonde, Swedish-looking and sported a track suit/soccer mom ensemble for starters. A “Vunder Vuman” who assists government agent Steve Trevor (Kaz Garas), as he attempts to recover stolen code books from villain, Abner Smith (Ricardo Montalban). Um, okay. Lynda Carter’s much-celebrated performance in the


‘70sWonder Woman series, literally made dizzy queens, out of the boys who spun ‘round and ‘round in order to transform into their favorite heroine. Following in the footsteps of theBatman series of the ‘60s, the show had a dose of camp thrown in for good measure. How could good GITs (gays-in-training) resist? Beginning as a two-hour pilot movie, it explained her origins on Paradise Island. Thrown into a tizzy when Major Steve Trevor (Lyle Waggoner) crash lands on the all-female island. (Surprisingly, not called The Isle of Lesbos…But I digress), She leaves her mother, aka: Cloris Leachman, next played by Caroline Jones in the subsequent series and all the other ladies behind to join in the fight for the old red, white and blue. For the first year of the show in 1976, ABC’sWonder Woman battled Nazis during WWII and had her kid sister Drusilla (Debra Winger) by her side as Wonder Girl. You go, Wonder Girl! When the show moved over to CBS asThe New Adventures of Wonder Woman, it was rebranded and brought forward to the 1970s, along with Carter


and one other cast member, the suave Lyle Waggoner, who played Steve Trevor, Jr. in two seasons that saw Wonder Woman, aka Diana Prince, doing battle in scenarios such as fighting a telepathic disco dancer who uses his powers to steal people’s minds in the episode “Disco Devil.” Nope…Couldn’t make that up if I tried. The show left the air in 1979, but remained forever in the hearts of the LGBTQ community. Save for a pilot episode, poor Adrianne Palicki


didn’t really get a chance to step into the iconicWonder Woman outfit for long. Said costume get up and the proposed 2011 update...Well, let’s just say were “horrible.” The first version looked like it was crafted from leggings and a bustier and after much interweb decrying from fans, the second version, ended up looking like a slutty Wonder Woman costume a college girl would wear for Halloween. Needless to say, the David E. Kelley pilot did not


live to see the light of day, as was the case for theCW’s proposedAmazon, which mainly focused on the origins of the Themyscira Princess. It made it to the script process, only to be put on hold by the network in 2013.


THE SILVER SCREEN Throughout the past 20 years, a number of efforts


have made it to big screen adaptations, with versions featuring Jennifer Aniston and Sandra Bullock. Her first celluloid appearance though, was in 2014’sThe Lego Movie…And yeah, that counts. Suffice it to say however, she was the best part of 2016’sBatman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. At a runtime of two hours and 31 minutes, with only 10 minutes of fighting… Really? I call shenanigans! Gadot seems more than capable of stepping into


the solid foundation laid by Carter. Her solo venture is set during WWI and co-stars Chris Pine as Steve Trevor, with Robin Wright as her Amazonian mentor and Connie Nielsen as her mother. When their island is attacked by men and their machines, they retaliate with badass chicks who kick ass. Wonder Woman then travels with Steve, posing as his secretary, to aid the Allies. On November 17, Justice League will hit theaters,


telling the story of Batman (Ben Affleck) and Wonder Woman (Gadot) as they track down metahumans


Aquaman (Jason Momoa, hubba-hubba), Flash (Ezra Miller) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) to form a united front against villainous Steppenwolf. So there you have it, a brief herstory of the most popular, female super hero


of our time. A woman who has stood the test of time as a shining example of a strong role model for women…And gay men alike. You’re a wonder, Wonder Woman!


MAY 2017 | RAGE monthly 19


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