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crappie is called pulling baits. Fishermen who do this usually throw out small jigs and troll along with their electric trolling motor. They know by the speed they troll as to how deep the jigs are running. They do quite well in catching fish. Most of them fish out of a regular boat not a pontoon because it’s easier to line up the poles out the sides. Although, if I have enough people on the boat I’ll run another 6 rods out the back of my boat.


A lot of folks still use the bobber technique to catch a mess of crappie. They find some kind of underwater structure (usually a tree) and cast their bobber near it. The lines are rigged with a split shot weight and a minnow attached to a gold Aberdeen hook.


Setting up a boat for crappie trolling is not very difficult.


You can either mount rod holders permanently or use screw on holders made for pontoon rails. I would be happy to assist with the setup of your boat for crappie fishing. You can also come on down to see mine and get ideas for your boat.


About Bill McDonald:


Bill McDonald is a resident of SLV and a member of the SLV Rod & Gun Club. Bill is originally from the Buffalo, NY area where he fished lakes Erie and Ontario, primarily for Trout and Salmon. When Bill moved to Atlanta he started fishing Lake Thurmond for Bass and Crappie. He has been fishing Lake Thurmond for over 18 years. You may contact Bill at mcdo33@cs.com


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