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Wounded Bull in Victorian England. Love Yr Puppy. Spike Milligan’s Tape Recorder. Fuck My Old Boots. Te Universe Explodes Into A Billion Photons of Pure White Light. Just a few of the bangers created by Te Membranes, the much lauded post punk outfit headed up musical legend John Robb. After over two decades of doing other stuff, their fantastic new album Dark Matter/Dark Energy has been critically acclaimed. Te Membranes are headlining Outline’s night at Te Owl Sanctuary as part of Norwich Sound & Vision this year, so we had a gas with John himself about space, phone boxes and the origin of punk’s rage.


W


e’re so delighted that you’ve agreed to headline our night


at Norwich Sound & Vision – thank you!


No problem! I’ve been to Sound & Vision a few times; it’s always a great event and Norwich is a cool town to go to every year. It’s far enough from London not to be tainted by it – it’s got its own little flavour going on which is always quite interesting. Te band began back in 1977 in Blackpool. What was the town like back then, and who were you seeing live and listening to? Blackpool’s the butt of metropolitan jokes, considered a run down, tacky, battered town, and there is an element of that that’s actually quite attractive in a way but underneath there’s always been a really cool scene with music and weird artful stuff. In the pre-internet era we were pretty cut off up there, so even going to Manchester felt like a major adventure. When we started the band we were very young – I was 16 and the drummer was 13 – we definitely had ideas on how we wanted to do things, in the same way as Let’s Eat Grandma I suppose! We were just fumbling about,


18 / September 2016/outlineonline.co.uk


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