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12 THE GREENSBORO TIMES


Legacy of Excellence > from page 1 After graduating from Morehouse in 1965, he entered Meharry Med-


ical College in Nashville, Tenn., where he was granted the MD degree in 1969. From Nashville, he went to St. Louis, Mo., for his internship and residency in ophthalmology. At Homer Phillips Hospital, he was trained by Dr. Howard Venable, one of the foremost trainers of ophthalmologist in the country. Dr. Venable trained more black and foreign ophthalmologists that any other person in this country prior to 1975. He had a profound impact on Brewington’s life and development as a doctor.


Dr. Brewington was granted a deferment from active duty in Viet-


nam by virtue of his being selected to participate in the Berry Plan. This program allowed doctors in training to complete their training before hav- ing to go on active duty. After his training, Dr. Brewington served two years as a major in the U. S. Army at Ft. Jackson, S. C. During his last year of active duty, he served as chief of the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic. He was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal upon his discharge in August, 1975.


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since July 1976. In 1994, while continuing to practice ophthalmology, he entered the evening program at North Carolina Central University Law School. He received the JD degree in June 1998. He successfully passed the bar on his first attempt. He was officially sworn in to practice before the N. C. Bar and the Federal Bar by his patient and good friend, Judge Henry Frye, Jr.


Dr. Brewington has been practicing ophthalmology in Greensboro Broader Change > from page 1


THE GREENSBORO TIMES


ogy and the American College of Legal Medicine. He is also a member of the Old North State Medical Society, the National Medical Association, the Greensboro Medical Society, the North Carolina Medical Society, the greater Greensboro Medical Society, the North Carolina Society of Eye Physician and Surgeons, and the American Medical Association.


Dr. Brewington is married to Janice Gilyard Brewington, Ph. D. To


cited in a class-action lawsuit, Baltimore police made 76,497 arrests with- out warrants in 2005 — a stunning number for a city of 622,000 people. Nearly 15 percent of the arrests were for minor offenses, such as loitering, obstructing pedestrian traffic, disturbing the peace, and failure to obey an officer. Instead of working with community leaders to rein in the truly bad actors — as Boston police have done — police in Baltimore have alienated whole swaths of their city by casting too wide a net.


Dr. Brewington is a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmol- Unwarranted arrests upend the lives of ordinary people who can lose


her, he is extremely grateful for her love, assistance, encouragement , sup- port, and cooperation. They have six children: Kathryne (deceased), Ran- dy, Michelle, Aisha, Tracy and Brea. They have four grandchildren: Heru, Nigel, Nylen, Sidney, and Brendon. He is an active member of Genesis Baptist Church.


their jobs, their savings, and their faith in the justice system when they are taken to jail on charges that would never have been brought against a mid- dle-class suburbanite. To make matters worse, many have lodged credible allegations of brutality against police during these arrests. In the last five years alone, Baltimore paid out $5.7 million in judgments or settlements to more than 100 people who sued, according to The Baltimore Sun.


This is the context in which Mosby challenged not only Gray’s phys- ical treatment by police but the legality of his arrest in the first place.


Mosby announced that Gray’s arrest was unlawful because police did not have probable cause, and because the knife they eventually found


Lame Argument > from page 1


“black” or “n*gger’ was inserted in front of the slave’s given name in order to distinguish the slave from a local white person of the same name. Hence, “Black Joe” or “N*gger Joe.” While the usage of the word is complex, and the word is embraced by youth culture, adults generally shun the word as harmful and offensive. Typically, the word is deemed offensive when used by whites towards blacks, and whites use that word at their own peril.


The n-word has been embraced by some in the black community,


as oppressed groups tend to do in an effort to reclaim and defuse deroga- tory terms used against them. Many people — most notably rappers — will even argue that altering the spelling of the word to n*gga signifies a change in its meaning. Teaching Tolerance editor Sean Price of the South- ern Poverty Law Center noted that the n-word, even when used as a term of endearment, has been unable to shed its baggage as an intentionally derogatory word.


“The poison is still there. The word is inextricably linked with vio-


lence and brutality on black psyches and derogatory aspersions cast on black bodies. No degree of appropriating can rid it of that bloodsoaked history,” Price said. “If you could keep the word within the context of the intimate environment [among friends], then I can see that you could po- tentially own the word and control it. But you can’t because the word takes on a life of its own if it’s not in that environment.” Noting the difficulties arising when discussing the public vs. private uses of the word, Price noted that Jesse Jackson, who was one of the first people to call for an n-word moratorium, was caught using the n-word while on a live mic during a so- called private conservation.


yet today, the word is as popular as ever, as the Washington Post concluded last year. But could the attention paid to the Confederate flag cause us to take another look at the n-word and decide to put it away for good? After all, the parallels between the two powerful concepts, one a word, the other a symbol, are clear. Both have been used — often at the same time — to terrorize black men and women and to make the case for oppression. One might even say the Confederate flag is the n-word flying on a pole.


using it — although in a non-gratuitous way — to make a point about racism, how America is not cured of it, and how racism goes beyond the n-word and overt discrimination.


What’s ironic is that backers of both the n-word and the flag use sim-


when they searched him was too small to be illegal in Maryland. A jury might not find the case so clear-cut. Gray was arrested after he


ran away from police. While fleeing an officer is not a crime, and therefore should not by itself result in an arrest, the US Supreme Court ruled in the case California v. Hodari that flight constitutes “reasonable suspicion” to stop someone for questioning. And even if the knife proves legal under Maryland law, it’s not clear that a police officer should face criminal pen- alties for guessing wrong about the size of a knife.


In 2007, the NAACP staged a mock funeral for the racial slur, and Mosby’s aggressive charges seem aimed at sending a broader mes-


sage about how police have been doing their jobs.Now it will be up to a grand jury to examine the evidence and decide which charges, if any, will be included in an indictment. The six police officers charged in this case will no doubt feel unfairly singled out for behavior that does not appear to be uncommon on the force. They are, in fact, being singled out as an example of what needs to change.


The word has power, and President Obama demonstrated that by Mosby is particularly well-suited to push for change in police cul-


ilar arguments to justify keeping these relics of hate active in our society today. Just as supporters of the n-word would say the slur has been trans- formed into a term of endearment, supporters of the Confederate flag argue the rebel battle emblem has come to represent Southern pride and heritage.


Black Women > from page 2


premacy and the subjugation of black people. The purpose of South Caro- lina and ultimately the other Southern states seceding from the Union was over their right to keep black people in chains and “an increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery.”


substantive and strategic, but also fun and, hopefully, inspiring.”


gation and the Dixiecrat Party, used by the Ku Klux Klan and by the Whites Citizens’ Councils — the white-collar Klan — to wage terror against black people. After the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, states in the former Confederacy began to fly the rebel flags over state houses and incorporate the Confederate emblem into their state flags as an act of resistance to racial integration.


From its inception, the Confederate flag was a symbol of white su-


The First Lady also noted that events like those in Baltimore and Fer- guson, where unarmed Black men have been killed by police, have caused many African Americans to challenge the criminal justice system.


profile cases of Black men getting killed by police. Friction between po- lice and the Black community has intensified since 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, in Ferguson, Mo. Wilson was cleared by a grand jury.


The Freddie Gray, Jr., incident was the latest of a number of high- After the Civil War, the rebel flag was a logo for states’ rights, segre-


“They’re rooted in decades of structural challenges that have made


vative whites to whitewash the white supremacy out of the Confederate flag and the Confederacy itself, recasting the Civil War as a struggle over states’ rights and taxes rather than slavery and rebranding the South in a positive and righteous light. Researcher Ed Sebesta wrote recently in BlackCommentator.com that the neo-Confederate movement has been un- der the radar screen for years yet is influential and part of the establish- ment, the movers and shakers in power. “The flags and monuments may come down but the neo-Confederate movement is still there. They are still generally not known to the public and they are still having an enormous impact,” Sebesta wrote. “For example, the Politically Incorrect Guide to American History is a New York Times best seller, it is written by Thomas Woods, a leading neo-Confederate. The American conservative movement is learning its American history from a neo-Confederate,” he added.


Wise words. That’s true inspiration. What do you think?


The n-word, not unlike the Confederate flag, was born from a place


The Greensboro Times Newspaper


Greensboro Times Newspaper


Established 2002


008, pertaining to contents of this issue, all rights are reserved.


Established 2002


The Greensboro Times Newspaper


Established 2002 Earl Jones, Publisher/Editor


Contributing Writers: Queshonda Moore Adams


© Copyright 2008, pertaining to contents of this issue, all rights are reserved.


Earl Jones, Publisher/Editor Adri-Anne Jones, Managing Editor


Shout Out to 662-2606 The Shout Out Line


Contributing Writers: Queshonda Moore Rep. Alma Adams


Hello, I’m calling to thank the Greensboro Times for informing it readers that Sarah Palin lost her bid to become Miss Alaska to an African-American woman. I love your paper because we get so much


Public Notice for Technology Consulting Services Willie Dixon


Dr. Pat Bonner, PHD Dwight “DC” Collins Ida Davis


The Shout Out Line


Hello, I am wondering whatever happened to the City’s investigation of the 93 black male citizens in ce harassment or miscon-


The Shout Out Line Adri-Anne Jones, Managing Editor


of hate. And we must understand this. These two symbols are not the be all and end all, but symbols do matter. And now is the time that we stop wasting energy supporting them and let them go.


The Greensboro Times Newspaper


Established 2002


© Copyright 2008, pertaining to contents of this issue, all rights are reserved.


Earl Jones, Publisher/Editor The Shout-Out line


Contributing Writers: Queshonda Moore Rep. Alma Adams


© Copyright 2008, pertaining to contents of this issue, all rights are reserved.


Shout Out to 662-2606 The Shout Out Line


Historian:


Teen Reporter: Photographer:


Hello, I’m calling to thank the Greensboro Times for informing it readers that Sarah Palin los to become Miss Alaska to an African-American woman. I love your paper because we get s information that the main print media choose not to report. I haven’t observed this shown or on CNN, NBC, ABC, FOX or Headline News. Thank you for informing us of this in your las issue (September ’08). Keep up the good work.


Dr. Pat Bonner, PHD Dwight “DC” Collins Ida Davis


Willie Dixon


Hello, I am wondering whatever happened to the City’s investigation of the 93 black m the City’s police “black book.” Were these black males subject to any police harassme duct? Does anyone on the City Council care? We have heard about the status of the gations and law suits regarding the police but not this issue. . . . Now the black male gered species, especially in Greensboro . . .


Rev. Dr. Gregory Headen Nathaniel Marshall Richard Koritz Michael Troutman Dennis Winston


The Shout Out Line


Hello, G-Times, you know what’s up with this Sarah Palin, Joe six pack obsession. M six pack types I know voted for Bush not once but twice. Most of them are worse off t four years ago and three of them have lost jobs that they worked on for more than ten Pack should be mad as hell at Bush and should fear a McCain Palin presidency that make their income status worst. . .


Hello, I’m calling to thank the Greensboro Times for informing it readers that Sarah Palin lost her bid to become Miss Alaska to an African-American woman. I love your paper because we get so much information that the main print media choose not to report. I haven’t observed this shown or reported on CNN, NBC, ABC, FOX or Headline News. Thank you for informing us of this in your last month issue (September ’08). Keep up the good work.


Lewis Brandon Marisa March Otis Hairston, Jr., Howard D. Gaither


The Shout Out Line The Shout Out Line


Hello, I am wondering whatever happened to the City’s investigation of the 93 black male ci the City’s police “black book.” Were these black males subject to any police harassment or duct? Does anyone on the City Council care? We have heard about the status of the other gations and law suits regarding the police but not this issue. . . . Now the black male is an gered species, especially in Greensboro . . .


Hello, this is Benny and I want to send a shout out to my running partners who are di Cowboy fans. . . I can’t stand the so-called America’s team, the Dallas Cowboys. . . T games now and I just want to bask in it. The Carolina Panthers is the team to bea


The Shout Out Line


Well, it appears that the Bush Administration has allowed the rich and greedy Wall Stre the American people blind. Bush’s no rich man left behind philosophy resulted in the t of dollars from the 401-K plans of millions of Americans. . . and it was all legal . . . Bu impeached and the top brass on Wall Street should be put on trial and sent to jail for criminal conduct . . .


The Shout Out Line Adri-Anne Jones, Managing Editor


Shout Out to 662-2606 The Shout Out Line


The Shout-Out line 662-2606


Shout Out to 662-2606 The Shout Out Line


The Shout Out Line The Shout-Out li The Shout-Out lin


Hello, I’m calling to thank the Greensboro Times for informing it readers that Sarah Pa to become Miss Alaska to an African-American woman. I love your paper because we information that the main print media choose not to report. I haven’t observed this sho on CNN, NBC, ABC, FOX or Headline News. Thank you for informing us of this in yo issue (September ’08). Keep up the good work.


too many folks feel frustrated and invisible,” she said. “And those feelings are playing out in communities like Baltimore and Ferguson and so many others across this country.”


Meanwhile, over the years, a movement has emerged by conser- And Michelle Obama shared profound thoughts with the graduat-


ing class at Tuskegee University about how to handle cruel criticism and derogatory comments.


“My husband and I know how frustrating that experience can be,”


she said. “We’ve both felt the sting of those daily slights throughout our entire lives. … And all of that is going to be a heavy burden to carry.”


“But,” she added, “those feelings are not an excuse to just throw up


our hands and give up. They are not an excuse to lose hope. To succumb to feelings of despair and anger only means that in the end, we lose.”


ture. Her mother, father, grandfather, and four of her uncles were all police officers in Boston. She was elected on a platform of greater accountability from police. Regardless of what happens at trial with these six officers, Baltimore’s police department must change.


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