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POOL & SPA INDUSTRY


EU Swimming Pool Legislation


FOLLOWING ON FROM THE LAST ISSUE, SPATA TECHNICAL ADVISER PETER LANG TAKES A FINAL LOOK AT RELEVANT INDUSTRY STANDARDS FROM BOTH HOME AND ABROAD


n the last issue, I gave an overview about the European standards relating to swimming pool equipment (the BS EN 13451 series). In this issue there is a focus on some of the other relevant standards from at home and abroad. We start with BS EN 15288.


I


BS EN 15288 is concerned with Safety in Design and Safety in Operation and refers solely to the commercial swimming pool with domestic pools being specifically excluded. In the BS EN 15288,


Part 1 comprises 22 pages, of which pages 5 to 19 are the relevant pages and Part 2 comprises 32 pages, of which pages 5 to 28 are the relevant ones.


While Part 1 is more relevant for pool builders than Part 2, both are important and pool builders should be familiar with each. Key paragraphs in Part 1 are: • Para 5.1 – General Design: In particular the number of users for each area of the complex, allowing a water surface area of 3m² per bather, access for disabled users, and design of bare feet areas


• Para 5.4 – Materials: They shall be suitable for the environment, particularly stainless steel which is under a stress loading


• Para 5.2 – Layout: This deals not only with the space around the pool, but the location of changing areas, toilets, showers and the segregation of wet and dry areas


• Para 5.5.2 – Circulation Areas: Avoiding sudden changes in floor height, single step


“WHEN BUILDING A COMMERCIAL POOL, MAKE SURE YOU ARE AWARE OF THESE REQUIREMENTS AND REMEMBER THAT SPATA MEMBERS CAN PURCHASE MOST BRITISH AND EUROPEAN STANDARDS WITH A 20% DISCOUNT OFF THE FULL PRICE”


www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk height < 180mm, Ramps <8%


• Para 5.5.5 – Lighting: Use as much natural light as possible, take into account the effect of sunlight coming into the building; use underwater light in deep areas and outdoor pools at night


• Para 5.5.7 – Pool Hall Heating & Ventilation: Typical figures: Pool Hall 28 - 29°C , Humidity <60%, air speed <0.1m/s


• Para 5.6 – Generally the Pool Shell: Deck level – mark edge in a contrast colour, freeboard – distinguish the edge from the surrounds, non swimming areas <1.35m, rest ledges to be considered in depths > 1.4m with a minimum width 100mm


• Para 5.8 – Pool Covers: Further work is likely to be needed, as proposed new CEN Standards as part of the EN 13451 series are not currently going ahead


• Para 5.11 – Chemical Storage: Must have dedicated rooms for Type 1 pools and dedicated rooms are recommended for Types 2 and 3, rooms should be ventilated, have bunds for liquids and alarms for gas


• Para 5.12 – Plant rooms: Should have space for the equipment, the operation of equipment and the repair or replacement of equipment


The second part of BS EN 15288 is about Operation etc. The key paragraphs are: • Para 5.1 – Operating Procedures and Risk Assessments


• Para 5.2 – Safety Procedures • Para 6.1.1 – Occupancy • Para 6.1.6 and Annex A – Dye Testing • Para 6.1.9 – Maintenance of Equipment • Para 6.1.10 – Handling of Chemicals • Para 6.1.11 – Application of Chemicals • Para 7.2.1 c – Plan of Facility • Para 7.2.3.1 – Signage


While some of the information in the previous paragraphs is for the pool operators, it also contains comments about what is required by the designer and installer. When building a commercial pool, make sure you are aware of these requirements and remember that SPATA members can purchase most British and European standards with a 20% discount off the full price.


Both parts of the Standard are currently being reviewed as part of a normal five year cycle for all BS-ENs and it is hoped that additional advice (to improve interpretation) will be available within the revised Standards. SPATA is part of the BSI mirror committee that is liaising with CEN. Other existing European standards include EN 15836 (Parts 1 and 2) regarding thicknesses for the liner pool material for in-ground swimming pools.


There are also in excess of 20 standards relating to swimming pool chemicals to ensure suitability for use in swimming pool water treatment. The standards are developed by a Technical Committee (TC 164 – Water Cycle) and the relevant Working Group (WG9 – Public Water Supply) with assistance from a Task Group (TG11) dealing specifically with swimming pool chemicals. In the UK, the body responsible for standards is the British Standards Institution (BSI) and the relevant BSI Committee dealing with the work of TC 164 WG9 TG11 is CII/59. The standards available include aluminium based coagulants, sodium hypochlorite, chlorine, hydrochloric acid, calcium hypochlorite and powdered activated carbon.


It is anticipated that at least four new standards for swimming pool chemicals are to be drafted for the following substances: polymeric quarternary ammonia, cyanuric acid, BCDMH, and PHMB. It is also anticipated that work may be starting on a standard for Glass as a Filter Media. Finally, please remember that a European standard is over-ridden by a national law and as an expert, you will be expected to have knowledge of the relevant legislation and standards and be using them in your work. SPN


PETER LANG


Peter is an independent consultant and SPATA’s Technical Adviser. He is a SPATA Inspector and Chairman of SPATA’s Technical Committee.


SPN August 2014 35


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