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MBA ENTREPRENEURS ARE CHANGING THE WORLD - FOR THE BETTER


Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson thinks the best business ideas are those with real meaning. These three MBAs are using entrepreneurship to solve big issues in India, Syria and Sudan.


Sir Richard Branson, one of the greatest entrepreneurs of his age, agrees that the best businesses are often those that make a difference in the world.


The founder of Virgin, one of the biggest brands that have over 360 different companies under its banner, become an entrepreneur when he was a teenager. He may not have studied an MBA, but his circumstances were shared by many business school start-ups today.


He launched his first business, a magazine called Student, during the Vietnam War when he was 15. He aspired to end the conflict and become an entrepreneur out of need, not greed.


Sir Richard told a live-stream audience, part of Global


Entrepreneurship Week, that the best business ideas are somewhat humble.


“It was a dreadful war and young people all over the world wanted to rise up and stop it,” he said. "We had to become entrepreneurs in order to ensure the business survived.


"Often the best businesses come when people have the idea and want to make a difference. In the process they end up trying to make sure more money comes in so they can survive.”


There is an increasing trend in MBAs shunning traditional jobs in favour of entrepreneurial start-ups.


But there are also those that seek to use entrepreneurship to improve the world. Social impact and entrepreneurship are often merged and business schools provide the perfect platform for MBAs to develop their world-changing ideas.


One such MBA, Bharath Maguluri, completed the full-time program at


EMLYON Business School earlier this year and has already begun work on restoring the education system in his home, India.


Fixing Education In India Bharath is now spearheading the financial and academic management of 10 schools in Southern India with his father. K12 Techno Services Pvt. Ltd is responsible for over 150,000 students.


He graduated from Ohio State University and then began an MBA at EMLYON in France. Bharath returned with fresh ideas to bolster his family's education business.


Education is a problem in India and today, just 58 per cent of children complete primary school. Of those, only 10 per cent go on to study at college. Literacy rates are as low as 74 per cent and in the countryside; schools are often of a poor quality.


Bharath wants to use


entrepreneurship to change that. "I had a passion for education and when I came back, when I had got my


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