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and only train their bodies. Then you are just a technician,” he observes.


Building a true foundation for health requires under- standing the importance of each building block, not just working with a trainer for a few sessions and afterwards going blindly through the motions, attests Sandra Blackie, a former professional bodybuilder, certified nutritionist and current personal trainer in San Diego, California. “I want to educate my clients.”


During extended periods, good trainers also revise routines


at least once every four weeks to prevent adaptation, another problem that can hinder reaching fitness goals. “Without trainers, people often get stuck in a rut and lose motivation,” remarks Blackie, who also adapts exercises according to bodily changes due to aging or other conditions. Long-term relationships also allow trainers to focus on


the individual’s bottom-line goals, Cotton notes. For instance, “I want to lose 10 pounds,” might really mean, “I want the energy to play with my kids,” or “I want to feel more alert at work.” “Achievable goals evolve from values,” Cotton explains.


“It’s not about getting in super great shape for six months and then stopping. It’s about creating a foundation for life.”


Freelance journalist Debra Melani writes about health care and fitness from Lyons, CO. Connect at DebraMelani.com or DMelani@msn.com.


Traits to Look for in a Trainer


by Cecily Casey


Engage a personal trainer based on his/her positive responses to the following qualifiers.


4 Starts by discussing short- and long-term goals 4 Customizes a program for individual needs 4 Reviews one’s health history in detail 4 Conducts a posture analysis 4 Screens each client for quality of movement 4 Asks the client to track his or her food intake 4 Provides helpful cues for improvement during sessions 4 Critiques movement from various angles


4 Is able to ramp up or ease off exercise challenges as needed


4 Never uses the phrase, “No pain, no gain”


4 Keeps current with educational certifications, work shops and seminars


Cecily Casey is co-owner of RealFit Gym, in Highland Park, IL, where she is a practicing American College of Sports Medicine certified personal trainer.


natural awakenings September 2013 39


Finding the Willpower to Work Out in Naples by Lee Walker


W


hen the will to work out fizzles, Southwest Floridians that are unable to meet the challenges


of resistance, procrastination and other roadblocks to staying on a path of regular exercise are finding it help- ful to use the services of local certified personal train- ers. Jay Weitzner, owner of Symmetry Fitness; Justin Schold, owner of Naples Home Training; Micah West, owner of Transcendent Fitness; and Patricia Wilborn, owner of Pilates Gyrotonic Yoga Studio, offer guidance and motivation. At Transcendent Fitness,


where the benefits of work- ing with kettlebells is the focus, West finds that clients are motivated when they understand their own move- ment dysfunctions and limi- tations, which are measured by a functional movement screen. “Our movement-


—Continued on page 40.


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