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Hair to Dye For T


coverartist


hree-quarters of American women are interested in chang- ing their hair color, particularly to cover gray, according to a Clairol study. But other studies show they should be wary of most traditional hair dyes and consider natural alternatives. A study from the University of Southern California published in the International Journal of Cancer, for example, identi- fied women using permanent hair dyes at least once a month to be at the highest risk for bladder cancer. As early as 2007, the European Union banned 22 potentially dangerous chemicals in cosmetic and body care products, including hair dyes. In the journal Materials last year, British researchers warned of the increased cancer risk from toxic chemicals called secondary amines, found


in European- and U.S.-manufactured permanent hair dyes, because they remain on the hair for extended periods long after application and can penetrate skin. Meanwhile, increasing demand by consumers for safer products has expand- ed the market for natural hair dyes containing henna, oils and extracts from berries and other fruits, plus vegetables. Many are now available at pharmacies, organic salons and online, including do-it-yourself recipes.


Protein for Breakfast Curbs Food Cravings S


kipping breakfast or eating sugary breakfast breads and cereals sets us up for increased appetite all day long, while protein-rich food ef- fectively satiates us, according to a recent Uni-


versity of Missouri-Columbia study. Subjects were 20 overweight young women, ages 18 to 20, divided into three groups: those that skipped breakfast, ate cereal, or enjoyed a 350-calorie, high-protein breakfast of eggs and lean meat. Research- ers tracking brain function concluded that those eating the high-protein breakfast were better able to control their eating throughout the day and evening. For people that don’t currently eat breakfast, lead researcher Heather Leidy, Ph.D., an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, says it only takes about three days to acclimate the body. Leidy suggests first trying plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese or egg or meat burritos. Aim for 35 grams of protein in the morning for all-day control of food cravings.


MILK LINKED TO ACNE T


eens with acne might consider cutting back on milk and other dairy products. Foods with a high-glycemic index (carbohydrates affecting blood sugar levels) are the leading causes of acne at all ages, according to a meta-review of studies and clinical trials published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Now, researchers at New York University say milk’s natural hormones may additionally stimulate the acne-producing hormones present at puberty. “Milk is designed to grow things—namely babies—and in the case of cows’ milk, calves,” comments Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution. “It’s naturally full of muscle-building anabolic hormones… which [also] cause bad acne.” Hyman con- siders cows’ milk “nature’s perfect food only if you are a calf,” and warns of “60-some hormones in the average glass of milk; even organic, raw and bovine growth-hormone-free milk.”


Yoga Wendy Butcher


Wendy Butcher began drawing in early childhood, inspired by artistic relatives. “I feel as though I was born with an artistic talent. A love of nature and my surroundings is what inspires my creations.” She went on to be- come a prolific illustrator. After earn- ing a certificate in advanced business marketing design from Sessions School of Design of New York, Butcher’s art career flourished. She is the founder of WB Designs, a print, illustration, website design and development stu- dio that specializes in creating brands for small businesses, nonprofits and independent artists.


When creating art, Butcher imagines her subjects and they come to life on canvas. Her cover image, Yoga, bloomed from a long-held hatha yoga practice. She creates in a variety of mediums, including digital art, painting and photography. “For painting, I work mostly in acrylics, pastels and watercolors,” says Butch- er. “My subjects appear in my mind. I don’t typically use other reference points.” Her illustrations are featured in many formats, including brochures, invitations, newsletters, postcards, note cards and website graphics. The New York native recently re- located to Melbourne, Florida, where she creates art in her home studio.


View the artist’s portfolio at WBDesigns.org.


natural awakenings September 2013 9


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