This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Your Healing Can


Begin Today • Improve Digestion


• Pain Relief from: Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, Sciatica & Migraines


• Sleep Better • Increase Energy • Fertility • Mood stabilization for Depression & Anxiety •Addiction Recovery


•Weight/Stress Management Call for a FREE phone


consultation and take control of your health today!


Eleonora A. Bowers, M.S., L.Ac. Licensed Acupuncturist & Herbalist


(201) 298-3112 • ProAcuHealth.com


150 Flanagan Way • Secaucus, NJ 07094 (Located inside the Kipnis PT Center)


editorial calendar 2013


OCTOBER environment


plus: energy therapy NOVEMBER


personal growth plus: mindfulness


DECEMBER


awakening humanity plus: holiday themes


tions. A 30-year-old working mother of two young boys, she felt she couldn’t af- ford to be sad or angry, even as she con- templated divorce. But something shifted when she began taking yoga classes in her town in northern Michigan. “It was my one place to relax and let go,” says Emily, who asked that her real name stay private. “I used to go to class, get into a deep stretch and cry. It was like my muscles were connected with my heart. My instructor would warn us that certain poses would provide emotional releases, and sure enough, the tears would fall.” People suffering disruptive changes —from losing a loved one to coping with unemployment or striving for sobriety— often find yoga to be a healing force. Lola Remy, of yogaHOPE, a Boston and Se- attle nonprofit that helps women navigate challenging transitions, attests that yoga makes them feel safe enough in their bodies to process difficult emotions. “The goal isn’t to make stressors


go away, it’s to learn resilience,” Remy explains. “Irreparable harm isn’t neces- sarily the only result of experiencing stress. Even if I’m in a challenging posi- tion—like wobbling in the tree pose—I can see that I’m still okay.” The object


22 Hudson County NAHudson.com


DEEP-HEALING YOGA W


Release Trauma, Build Resilience by Sarah Todd


hen a woman separated from her husband last fall, she tried hard to shut down her emo-


is to teach women that their bodies are strong and capable, giving them more confidence in their ability to weather obstacles off the mat.


Supporting Science Research suggests that yoga can also be an effective therapy for people affected by some forms of severe traumatic stress. A study in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences that scanned the brains of trauma survivors after a re- minder of the traumatic event revealed decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex—the part of the brain that helps make sense of raw emotions and bodily experiences.


While shutting down the connec- tion between body and mind can help in coping with dangerous experiences, it also makes recovery difficult. “You need to have a high-functioning pre- frontal cortex to organize the thoughts that come up and know that you’re safe in the present moment,” advises David Emerson, director of yoga services at the Trauma Center, in Brookline, Massachu- setts. “Otherwise, you’re assaulted by memory sensory information.” Yoga appears to rewire the brains of trauma survivors to stop reliving past distress. “You can’t talk your prefrontal cortex into functioning well again,” Em-


healingways


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48