This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
globalbriefs


Solar Socket Portable Power from Any Windowpane


GROW


Your Business Secure this ad spot!


973-928-8884


Publisher@ NAHudson.com


Yoga carves you into a different


person – and that is satisfying physically. ~Adam Levine


The Window Socket, a new device that at- taches to any window using a suction cup, provides a small amount of electricity to charge and operate small devices from its solar panel. Inventors Kyuho Song and Boa Oh, of Yanko Design, note, “We tried to design a por- table socket so that users can use it intuitively, without special training.”


Even better, the charger stores energy. After five to eight hours of charging, The Socket provides 10 hours of juice to charge a phone, even in a dark room. The device is not yet available in the United States.


Find more information at Tinyurl.com/WindowSocket.


Feathered Friends Food Shortages Guide Behavior


A new report published in American Naturalist by a pair of ecologists, W. Alice Boyle and Courtney J. Conway, at the University of Arizona, in Tuc- son, has determined that the primary pressure prompting short-distance bird migrations comes from seasonal food scarcity, not their amount of eating or living in non-forested environments, as was previously thought. “It’s not just whether they eat insects, fruit or nectar, or where they eat them; it matters how reliable that food source is from day-to-day,” says Boyle. A universal assumption has been that short-distance migration is an evolution- ary steppingstone to longer trips. The team’s work contradicts that idea by show- ing that the two are inherently different. They also found that species that forage in flocks are less likely to migrate. “If a bird is faced with food scarcity, is has two options,” Boyle notes. “It can either forage with other birds or migrate.”


Oil Alternative Bio-Breakthrough Can Reduce Fossil Fuel Use


Researchers at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, attest they have succeeded in using xylose, the most abundant sim- ple plant sugar, to produce a large quantity of hydrogen in a method that can be performed using any source of biomass. “Our new process could help end our depen- dence on fossil fuels,” projects Y. H. Percival Zhang,


the associate professor of biological systems engineering who is spearheading the initiative. This environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen utilizes renewable natural resources, releases almost zero greenhouse gases and doesn’t require costly heavy metals. Most hydrogen for commercial use is produced from natural gas, which is ex- pensive to manufacture and generates a large amount of the greenhouse gas car- bon dioxide. “It really doesn’t make sense to use non-renewable natural resources to produce hydrogen,” says Zhang. “We think this discovery is a game-changer in the world of alternative energy.”


12 Hudson County NAHudson.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48