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The Ugly and Beautiful face of Sierra Leone Cricket


Sierra Leone’s only cricket oval at Kingtom an eyesore By: Sahr Morris Jr.


For many sports loving Sierra Leoneans, terms like bowling, bats, wickets and run-out are strange. Majority of them are football enthusiasts who devote their attention to the round leather game.


Just a few of them could tell you that those terms belong to one of the most successful sporting dis- cipline in the world, a sport that is as successful as the much-craved football; Cricket.


Cricket is played by two teams of eleven players each on a pitch with two sets of three stumps (wickets), it involves a bowler from one side who bowls the ball down the pitch to the batsman of the opposing team who must defend the wicket. The object of the game is to score as many runs as possible.


Since the games was first introduced in Sierra Leone by the British Artillery Forces in 1898, cricket has become one of the most successful sporting discipline in the country and used as a reference point for the amount of international laurels that Sierra Leone as a nation has won on the interna- tional scene. The game’s resurgence in 2002 has been the key to its current strength in Sierra Leone. The then Sierra Leone Army SLA, now the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces RSLAF, was the first to have a test of the gentleman’s game at the Freetown Garrison of Tower Hill.


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