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Performing the FMS & Grading Systems


Grade three: The movement pattern should be completed and consistent with the FMS test definition. This score changes to zero if the athlete or client experiences pain. Grade two: The completed movement pattern should demonstrate compensation, faulty form or loss of align- ment as consistent with the FMS test definition. This score changes to zero if the athlete or client experiences pain. Grade one: The movement pattern is incomplete if not performed consistently with the FMS test definition. This score changes to zero if the athlete or client experiences pain.


Functional Movement Screen (Cook, 2001) 1. Deep Squat


Grade one


Grade two


Grade three


Purpose: The purpose is to assess bilateral, symmetry, mobility of the ankle, knee, hips, shoulder and the thoracic spine. Description: Starting position is shoulder width apart at 90 degrees with the dowel over their shoul- der. The athlete should descend in a squat position with at least performing the squatting movement three times. Feet must be flat on floor, head and chest forward and dowel pressed over head. Clinical implications: The ability to perform a deep squat requires closed kinetic chain of the ankle, knee and hips, extension of the thoracic spine, flexion and abduction of the shoulders. Poor perform- ance with this test could result to various factors such as limited mobility of the glenohumeral, tho- racic spine, or dorsi-flexion of the ankle and hip. Limiting factor must be identified when the athlete scores less than 3 points.


Hurdle Step


Grade 1


Grade 2


Grade 3


Purpose: To assess bilateral mobility and stability of the ankles, knees and hips 45


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