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Sports & Economics Cont’d from Page 39


Peter Mokaba Stadium, South Africa


Africans today have a voice like never before through social media and instead of sitting down and accepting the status quo and think it is the God given right of corrupt officials to continue to pilfer from us without saying a word like it has been for the better part of five decades, we should first of all; speak up, then create social network watchdog groups to identify and expose the ones that are responsible for the decline of our societies and most especially so our sports facilities and institu- tions.


People nowadays and for the better part of the1990’s and this first decade of the 21st century across Africa have had to turn and tune in to foreign leagues and sports programs to get their daily dose of sports entertainment and that is not to say that it is wrong for them to do that especially with a total lack and absence of a half way decent national league which has all but led to local sports fans ne- glecting their local leagues for the premier leagues of Europe, South America and North America. However everyone should keep in mind that sports is economics and if your dollars are going away to a foreign league when you buy memorabilia or a fan jersey or purchase a broadcast league ticket on TV from that league then you are in essence supporting that foreign league and that country’s economy which in many instances may have no bearing on the growth of your national economy. So instead of running away from the problem and complain all day long about the poor condition of the local league in your country and the lack of development of your nation you need to take a broader look at what afflicts your nations economy and find out what way you can contribute and step up and do something about it.


Sports infrastructure is the ground zero for the advancement of any and all national sports appara- tus. African nations who currently have a relic for a national stadium should strongly think about erecting a new national stadium to replace the old one as a starting point of reclaiming and rebuild- ing their national sports apparatus.


That construction should be followed by the appointment of a new breed of administrators who are 50


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