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Purpose: To assess bilateral shoulder range of motion combining rotation with adduction and exter- nal rotation with abduction. Description: Measure the distance from the distal wrist crease to the tip of the third digit. The ath- lete should make a fist with each hand and placed behind the back. The tester measures the gap between the two fists and record the distance. The athlete should perform the shoulder mobility test 3 times bilaterally. Clinical implications: This test requires a combination of motions including abduction/external rota- tion and adduction/internal rotation. Poor performance could relate to the following: external rotation with limited internal rotation for over head throwing athletes. Secondly, forward or rounded shoulder caused by excessive development and shortening of the pectoralis minor and/or latissimus dorsi muscles and thirdly, dysfunction in the scapulothoracic area may result in decreasing glenohumeral mobility. When athlete fails to achieve a score less than 3, limiting factor must be identified.


Active straight Leg Raise


Grade 3 (Any angle less than the above will be graded as 2 or 3) Purpose: To assess hamstring and gastroc/soleus flexibility while main- taining a stable pelvis Description: The athlete/client lays flat in a supine position with a 2” x 6” board placed under the knee of the athlete. The tester identifies the ath- lete’s anterior iliac spine (ASIS) and the mid-point of the patella. During the test the opposite knee should remain in contact with the dowel with the shoulder remaining flat on the floor. Once the athlete has achieved their end range position, a dowel is aligned along the medial malleolus of the test leg, perpendicular to the floor. This test should be performed at least 3 times bilaterally. Clinical implications: The ability to examine functional hamstring flexibil-


ity. The athlete should be able to demonstrate adequate passive illopsoas flexibility of the opposite leg as well as lower abdominal stability. Poor performance with this test could result to the following factors: Poor hamstring functional stability, secondly, inadequate passive mobility of the opposite hip may result as tightness of the illiopsoas thereby tilting the anterior pelvis. A combination of these two factors will demonstrate an athlete’s bilateral, asymmetric hip mobility. When athletes fail to achieve a full range of this test, the limiting factors must be identified.


Trunk Stability Push-Up


Grade 1


Grade 2


Grade 3


Purpose: Assessing truck stability in a sagittal plan while a asymmetrical upper extremity motion is performed Description: The athlete takes a prone position; hands placed shoulder width apart at the appropri- ate position with knee fully extended. The athlete is asked to perform a push up with the whole body lifted as a unit with no lag in the lumbar spine. The trunk stability test should be performed as many as three times.


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