This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THINGS TO DO IN 2013 50


RUNNING with our 50th edition anniversary theme we decided to highlight 50 things you can do in and around Dartmouth next year. Thousands of visitors flock to the area annually, attracted by its beauty, history, culture and the wealth of attractions and activities available. But how many locals make the most of what is on their doorstep? It’s all too easy to be blasé about our surroundings, after all we live with them every day, but why not make 2013 the year you take a fresh look at what’s on offer – you may be surprised at what you discover. Here are our top 50 list of things to do, why not have a go at one, some or even all of them.


Start the New Year by walking off the Christmas feasts we will no doubt all have indulged in by striding out and walking to Brixham along the South West Coast Path. This 11-mile hike is a hilly, often steep, walk through surprisingly remote countryside to the traditional fishing port of Brixham. The path leads past the Daymark, through woods, and around the edge of the National Trust Gardens at Coleton Fishacre towards Scabbacombe Sands, Long Sands and Man Sands. The path then rounds the beach at St Mary’s Bay and onto Berry Head country park which boasts stunning views and two historic forts. Wind your way down to Brixham Harbour and enjoy some well-earned fish and chips before catching the bus back to Dartmouth.


1


its Arts and Crafts-style house a visit. Travel back in time to the Jazz Age at the country home of the D’Oyly Carte family with its Art Deco-influenced interior, or lose yourself in the magical 30-acre garden, where paths weave


2


Talking about Coleton Fishacre, why not pay the luxuriant garden by the sea and


through glades, past tranquil ponds and tender plants in the moist and sheltered valley. Full of year-round interest, why not wrap up warm and explore the Coleton Fishacre’s beautiful gardens and woodland – you can always pop into Café Coleton for a warming hot chocolate afterwards.


While we are on the subject of the National Trust, head out in the opposite direction to another of its estates - Greenway House and Garden at Greenway. Here, visitors can take an extraordinary glimpse into the beloved holiday home of the famous and much-loved author, Agatha Christie and her family. The relaxed and atmospheric house is set in the 1950s and contains many of the family’s collections, including archaeology, Tunbridgeware, silver, botanical china and books. Outside you can explore the large and romantic woodland garden, with a restored vinery, wild edges and rare plantings, which drifts down the hillside towards the sparkling River Dart.


3


Enjoy a walk along the tranquil Dart Estuary from Little Dartmouth to Gallants Bower which has commanding views of the lower reaches of the River Dart. The coastal path is ablaze with colourful wildflowers in spring and summer, while the woods leading up to the hilltop Royalist civil war fort are awash with beautiful bluebells at the end of April. Keep an eye out for the greater spotted woodpecker en-route, and see if you can spot peregrine falcons hunting above the dramatic cliffs at Willow Cove. And don’t forget to feast your eyes on the spectacular views over the whole of Start Bay at Combe Point.


4


It may be on our doorstep but how many of us have actually visited Dartmouth Museum? Small it is but this fascinating and interesting museum housed in an atmospheric old merchant’s house built in the 1640’s is one of the best tourist attractions in town. It contains an extensive collection of artefacts, models, paintings and photographs which give an insight in Dartmouth’s maritime history, the town’s social and economic history and the physical


5


45


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116