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A SKYNYRD REUNION - Alan Walden and Bob Burns. (Photo by Roxanne Lark)


dedicated to it’s author Robert Nix with huge get well wishes. (Sadly, our friend Robert would pass away a short time later.) The boys didn’t miss a beat as they moved into The Allman brothers’ “Southbound.”


The first guest to take the stage was the leg- endary Paul Hornsby, taking a seat behind Brad’s keyboard rig to play on some of the songs he pro- duced and played on with Marshall Tucker back in the day. Also joining the party on fiddle was Maconite Randy Wesson. The three-song set was off the charts, with a smoking “This Ol’ Cowboy” followed by an absolutely beautiful “In My Own Way.” I happily stepped up to the mike to sing lead on Toy Caldwell’s most popular song, “Can’t You See.” I have performed that song hundreds of times, but tonight was different. I was on the stage where Toy and the MTB got their start, and playing with their producer, Hornsby. I could feel


the spirits of Capricorn past all around me. It was a warm feeling to be sure.


After swapping out a few musicians, we were ready to do some Skynyrd. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer Bob Burns took a seat behind Mike Satterfield’s brand new sparkling Palmetto Drums kit to help break them in on their first outing. Joining in was Bob’s current guitarist and former David Allan Coe lead man Bret Short. Also on guitar was our friend Jake Haldenwang, who never ceases to amaze.


I happily sang the classic “Gimmie Three Steps” while the drummer from the original record pounded furiously behind me. Brad Durden took over vocals for a smoking “Call Me The Breeze: and the immortal “Sweet Home Alabama.” The audience went nuts. This night was one for the books. The real deal. Southern rock came back home on this night.


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