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RON WHITE IT


By Derek Halsey


is the morning of the 2012 Florida primary election when I talk to comedian Ron White. When asked about the current state of affairs in what is one of the more unusual political cycles in recent memory, White, never a shy one, lets both sides of the aisle have it.


“I watch it all with disgust,” says White. “I don’t think there is a good candidate running for president. And I think that just because one pres- ident is doing a bad job, it’s not a reason to give the reigns to that idiot Gingrich.”


White is best known for being a part of the of the “Blue Collar Comedy Tour,” the troupe of comedians featuring White, Jeff Foxworthy, Bill Engvall and Larry The Cable Guy that stamped its brand on the comedy world a little over ten years ago.


Since then, with a couple of Grammy nomina- tions, hit TV specials and over 10 million CDs and DVDs of his solo work sold, White has carved out his own niche on the scene. His one- hour TV special titled “You Can’t Fix Stupid” became one of the highest-rated shows ever on the Comedy Central channel. In 2012, he is bringing his “Moral Compass” show to over 100 cities in America for a night of “mature audiences only” fun.


White is known for doing his standup routine with a simple array of props; a cigar, a stool, a glass of scotch on ice and a microphone. While the themes found in his comedy come from a southern perspective and from the point of view of the every-day blue collar experience, his humor is valued all over the country by all walks of life. Well, almost.


“I played in 148 cities last year,” says White. “I do every city in America. I play Radio City Music


Blue Collar Comedian On Politics, His Career and His Love of The Allman Brothers Band


Hall in New York and they laugh at the same thing there that they do in Mobile, Alabama, I can assure you of that. We all have the same human condition. If you have to wake up and get shit done in the day, you can relate. If you’re idle rich, you can’t relate. And it doesn’t matter if you are a lawyer or a farmer, if you’ve got shit you got to do, it’s the same condition. If you have kids that you have to educate, it’s all of these respon- sibilities and we’re all the same.”


When White was a youngster growing up in Texas, he was more of a ‘class comedian’ than a ‘class clown.’ In other words, he has always been able to make people laugh.


“I was a funny kid,” says White. “My brain works like this.


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