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CD Reviews


The Outlaws It’s About Pride (Rocket Science Ventures)


When The Outlaws new album, It’s About Pride, hits the streets on September


25, I predict a meteoric rise back to the top for one of southern rock’s most timeless bands. This will be the band's first studio album since 1994's Diablo Canyon. In the 18 years since, there has been a revolving lineup of players within the band. Following the death of front man Hughie Thomasson in 2007, founding band mem- ber Henry Paul took the reigns, brining together a tight, super talented group that includes fellow founding member, drummer/song- writer Monte Yoho, plus red hot lead guitarist Billy Crain, fellow smokin’ lead guitarist Chris


Anderson, keyboardist/vocalist Dave Robbins and bassist/vocalist Randy Threet. Now, make no mistake about it, these Outlaws rock as hard as ever, and It’s About Pride is one of the finest Outlaws records ever. From the opening track and brand new single “Tomorrow’s Another Night,” with its stellar vocal harmonies, to the title track, “It’s About Pride,” it is obvious that Henry and the boys are in it to win it. You’ve heard the term, “all killer, no filler?” They may as well have rubber stamped that across the front of this release.


“It’s About Pride” is the perfect sentiment for he whole southern rock band of brothers, with major tips of the hat to The Marshall Tucker Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd and such, with the band’s


own opinion of flying the flag of the south. In classic Outlaws fashion, the song kicks into over- drive at the end with a “Green Grass and Free Birds” style guitar-all-mighty jam. Chris Anderson and Billy Crain absolutely smoke one another. Awesome.


“Hidin’ Out in Tennessee” is the perfect song about a musician who decides to take some time off and away from the whole rock and roll circus, and songs like “Born to Be Bad,” “Last Ghost Town,” and “Right Where I Belong” further emphasize the fact that The Outlaws are back in full force. And “The Flame” is a absolutely perfect tribute to Hughie Thomasson, who’s nickname was “Flame.”


“Nothin’ Main About Main Street” could easily cross over as a country hit. After all, most of us southern folk are in full agreement with Henry’s thoughts here, as we watch the small independent and mom and pop stores get swallowed up by the corporate giants.


“Trail of Tears” finds Chris Anderson tackling the lead vocal. Fitting, especially since he penned the tune. Chris is a great vocalist, songwriter and needless to even say, guitar picker. On his song “Alex’s Song,” Randy Threet sings a beautiful, melodic love song reminiscent of Firefall. A really nice pop song.


“Trouble Rides a Fast Horse” and “So Long” deliver a real one-two punch to wrap up the album, with super hot rhythm guitar, perfect vocal harmonies, and another of those monster jams to close out the whole enchilada. It’s About Pride is a winner, something for these boys to be proud of.


- Michael Buffalo Smith 32


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