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FINDING FUN AT LOST VALLEY RANCH F


irst up, we head southwest of Denver to Sedalia, Colorado to check out Lost Valley Ranch and see what we can fi nd. Your inner cowboy, perhaps? LVR off ers fall roundups during their


adult (only) specialty week program and promises you an unforget able experience. T e fall foliage is spec- tacular, the air crisp and invigorating and you’ll be in the company of like-minded grownups, adding to the excitement. Surrounded by grandeur, sitting tall in the saddle, you’ll take a deep breath and believe that anything is possible. T e Lost Valley herd is a mix of Angus and Herefords;


each spring they are brought up to higher ground to graze the lush mountain meadow grasses. In the fall, they must be moved lower before the land is snuggled for the winter under a blanket of snow. T e scenery is spectacular but the work is real, even though they have been awarded AAA’s Four Diamond rating for 37 consecutive years. Very comfortable lodging—they call the décor


“Levi Luxurious”—is in 24 cabins of varied sizes scattered throughout the ranch’s tall pines. Cat le baron amenities abound, including fi re- places, porch swings, refrigerators, coff eemakers, hair dryers, CD players and oversized towels. Some cabins even have their own Jacuzzi tubs. Meals (as well as riding, etc.) are included in the rate


CONTACT INFO: ◗ 29555 Goose Creek Road ◗ Sedalia Colorado 80135-9000 ◗ 303-647-2311 ◗ www.lostvalleyranch.com


and you’ll fi nd the food prepared fresh from scratch, and in the best traditions of hearty Western cuisine. Meals will most likely be served in the dining room, but you might enjoy a picnic lunch in a meadow, an early ride breakfast on a mountaintop or an outdoor barbecue. Other things to do include tennis, swimming, fi sh-


ing, learning cat le penning, trap shooting, tubing or you might book a massage. (Come on now, would a wrangler do that?)


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“The Lost Valley herd is a mix of Angus and Herefords; each spring they are brought up to higher ground to graze the lush mountain meadow grasses. In the fall, they must be moved lower before the land is snuggled for the winter under a blanket of snow. The scenery is spectacular but the work is real.”


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