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down in the sand with me on her. We stopped half way at some picnic tables to take a break. I was siting on the table holding the reins, when all of a sudden the table started going up in the air. I looked around to see what it was…it was my horse, she had her bridle caught on the table. She pulled back, breaking the bridle in three places. Tis horse is always doing something every time we ride.


CHRISTA BASS: I was riding in the woods with a friend on my old QH Jake, and we were off trail and lost. We came to a creek that wasn’t safe to ride across, so we dismounted and she went first. I sent her horse across to her, then mine. Jake went right on by her and off into the woods, with her in pursuit. He was walking, staying just far enough ahead that she could grab his tail but not catch him. He led her all the way to the trail we had been trying to find, and stopped and stood there looking at us like we were idiots!


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SHARON FIATO: My horse got a hold of a plastic milk jug that had a few rocks in it and started shaking it. He discovered that the other horses were afraid of it so he chased them with it.


RHONDA MIA KING: I once saw my horse SweetHeart scratching her “hiney” on the gate at the corner of the lot. She was really geting into her scratchin’ when the gate pushed itself onto the hot wire be- hind it and she got the “Shock of her Life”!!! She shot out of the corner of the lot and all the way to the other side of the pasture and never knew what “bit” her. LOL!!!


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BOBBIE JO WEBER: My TWH Gypsy loved waterworks. On an endurance ride in Fort Stanton, New Mexico, she grabbed the float valve off a large water tank—and flooded base camp. She’d dip her head into a water tank up to her eyeballs and splash until everyone within earshot was soaked. On another occasion, she grabbed the edge of a 100-gallon Rubbermaid tub and dumped all of the water onto the ground.


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PATY BURNS TOHIDI: My mustang gelding Quickshot was standing next to a bull and a sheep… he ran from the sheep...


NOREEN STRONG REITHMEIER: My mini donkey constantly stands in front of my TWH at meal time and tries to threaten him away... he put up with this forever...then finally he’d had enough...picked her up by the scruff of her neck...held her there for a minute then deposit- ed her gently to the side...she never messed with his mealtime again...


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BOB BACON: I’m not too sure how proud I am of this but here it goes. Kelso my 8-year-old gelding likes to play with things, in this case it was a traffic cone out in the pasture. I looked out the window as Kelso was swinging the cone towards the cow in the next pasture and hit the cow on the nose. Great! I have the neighborhood bully in the back pasture.


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VIOLET TURLINGTON: When Litlebit, my sweet stud horse I just lost, was a foal; he found my daughter’s pogo ball mom had just sent to her. Well, he got down on his knees holding the darn thing down on its handles where you put your feet and pulled the ball out loose from it and slung the ball over his shoulder and fetched it and played with the ball the rest of the aſter- noon! It was so funny!


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JANE CROWNER TRYTKO: When the pas- ture is muddy and it’s time to feed my horse, JoJo, she seems to know I don’t like walking in the mud to get her feed bucket. She will pick up the bucket with her teeth and toss it into the air, trying to get the bucket closer to the fence where I feed her. I’m amazed how good she is at geting it closer to me. Sometimes it will flip over or fly farther away. Ten she will just stand there and stare at me like, ”What now, Mom?”


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Stay tuned for more silly horse antics in the July issue of Trail Blazer!


Q 14 | June 2012 • WWW.TRAILBLAZERMAGAZINE.US


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