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host whom they stayed with. Wylie Haynes continued on through the second and third long rides. A tragic event occurred during the 60-day cross-country


challenge. Sam Bass had got en loose, wandered into a rich alfalfa pasture and succumbed to colic. For the remainder of the third adventure, Bud rode a large, dark horse he named Big Black. Bud and Temp loved their horses and always gave them


credit for making their journeys possible. T ough the boys may have been the stars of the long rides, their horses made it all possible.


THE CHALLENGE Bud and Temple’s father Jack was having lunch with two


promoters, T ompson and Dundy, who had a penchant for gambling and always enjoyed a good bet. During a casual conversation about the dependability of a horse, T ompson had an interesting proposition. T ompson proposed a 60-day cross-country challenge,


from New York City to San Francisco. T e boys, riding alone once more, must ride from New York City to San Francisco within 60 days or less. T eir reward would be an astonishing $10,000. Jack knew right away that his boys would be up for the challenge. “Sure they could,” said Jack confi dently. “T ese two and their horses are the steadiest, sturdiest travelers I’ve ever seen. Dare ‘em to do it and see what they say. T ey’d make a trip like that at the drop of a hat.” Bud and Temp indeed said a resounding “Yes!” to the challenge and began planning their trip immediately. T e 60-day challenge had only four rules:


1. T e boys were not allowed to ride on Sundays. T is was very important to Jack; thus, Sundays were not included in the 60-day time limit.


2. Similarly, days in which the weather “providentially hindered” a safe ride was not included in the 60-day


T is map lays out the boys’ route from New York to


San Francisco. Listed along the way is each city of in- terest they stopped in. T eir last two adventures are listed as well. For more about their other adventures, visit BudandMe.com. Courtesy of BudandMe.com


Bud and Temple riding Sam and Wylie in a parade to welcome home Teddy Roosevelt during their second


adventure. T ey rode directly behind him and with his famous Rough Riders. Courtesy of BudandMe.com


time limit.


3. Bud and Temple were not allowed to sleep nor eat under any roof during the challenge (unless in case of emergency, i.e. illness).


4. Lastly, they were only permit ed one change of horse during the entire duration.


Bud and Temp were also required to send telegrams


whenever possible to let their father know their location and condition. T ese rules were easily agreed upon by Bud and Temple, and preparation soon began. Aſt er all, even at the young ages of seven and 11, the brothers had already completed two treacherous adventures in the last two years.


CROSS-COUNTRY IN 60 DAYS! It took nearly two weeks for Bud, Temp and their father


Jack to put together a route for the boys to take during their journey. T eir journey would go through New York, Penn- sylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and fi nally to California. Bud and Temp began their journey knee-deep in the Atlan-


tic Ocean at Coney Island. It was just a minute past midnight on August 11, 1911 when they started off . T ey took along only themselves, their horses and the necessary gear. Packed in one of their saddlebags was a fl ask fi lled with water from the Atlantic Ocean. Word spread far and wide of the journey. In nearly every city and town of substance the boys stopped in, they were greeted by crowds of fans and reporters. Much to the dismay of the townspeople, the boys could


never stay in any one place for long in order to make it within 60 days. Unlike their past adventures, Bud and Temple were unable to be hosted by town offi cials and spent every night


continued next page WWW.TRAILBLAZERMAGAZINE.US • June 2012 | 71


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