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basically the same; we have just added another aspect to our adventure. Most people travel with their passions; however, golf clubs, hiking boots and fi shing rods can be tucked away more easily. We carry ours in a trailer and we have to feed and water them.


GET READY, SET, GO! Before you start thinking seriously about full-time RVing with your


horse, you need to get your feet wet. Experience is the best teacher. T erefore, do as much traveling as you can. Start out slowly, going out for weekends. T en try a week at a time, then several weeks. T is is your best scenario to gain confi dence in yourself and get some experience under your belt. You will get a feel for what you like and don’t like in your equipment.


You will also get a good feel about your horse, and you will fi gure out very quickly if he is ready for traveling and trail riding. You need to have calm equines, horses that get along well with others and that can be tied to something secure without a problem. A horse that doesn’t mind where he spends the night and will eat and drink without a problem is a big plus on the road. A very wise vet once told me, “T ere has never been one reported case of a healthy horse starving to death when good food is set in front of him…or died of thirst when fresh, clear water is available,” no mat er how picky he is.


WHAT’S THE BEST TIME OF YEAR FOR TRAVEL? When Jim and I traveled in the summer, we would go to the moun-


tains as far into the wilderness as possible, bypassing the popular trailheads where it can be diffi cult to get a camping spot, and the trails are usually crowded. Traveling in the fall proved to be the best time


for us. Summer vacation was over, the weather was great for riding and the scenery would be spectacular with the fall colors. T ere would also be fewer people traveling, leaving plenty of places to camp and lots of trails to explore. However, fall is also the time for the sportsman who may be hunting in the area you are riding in. It’s best to fi nd out what hunting seasons are open in the section of the country you want to visit so you can avoid that area if at all possible.


YOUR ADVENTURE AWAITS! I know this information may stir up more questions in your mind. It


sure does in mine, and obviously I could continue writing, giving ad- vice and telling of more lessons learned. However, this small overview and the sidebar on page 50 will hopefully get you started on your way to a great adventure. I can tell you, the reality of traveling with your horses can be frustrating at times and a lit le unnerving once in a while. However, the rewards far outweigh any minor irritations. Life on the road is the most exciting and fun adventure one can have. I would do it all over again, in a heartbeat. Happy travels and happy trails!


Janine Wilder is an accomplished equestrian and author of “Trail Riding: A Comprehensive Guide to Enjoying Your Horse Outdoors” (Western Horse- man Books), an International freelance writer and photographer, Long Rider, lecturer and clinician. Janine’s full-time horse travels with her late husband,


Jim, have taken them to 49 states and over 150,000 miles (each!) on their horses Max and Smoke, a journey that has more than qualifi ed them as expert horse travelers, trail riders and horse campers.


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