This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Learning To Drive Life


Web links Young Marmalade www.youngmarma-


lade.co.uk Endsleigh www.endsleigh.co.uk


The average premium is a whopping £4,006 for a young male driver


initiatives such as the Wasted Lives programme in Lancashire, or Driver Safety Workshops in Staff ordshire - it needs to be coordinated, says Rob. “It should become part and parcel of the school academic year.” Such education does make a


diff erence, says Sophie Voice, 18, whose views, and those of her friends, changed dramatically following a two-day talk organised by Surrey County Council on safe driving at Godalming College. “They had parents come in and talk to us about how they’d lost their children through car accidents. Some people, a couple of years older than us, came in wheelchairs or with disabilities that they’d got because of careless driving.” It had a strong impact on the class she says, “Since having this talk, it’s brought awareness. It’s made people think about their speed, how many people they take in the car at once, playing loud music and being more in control.” George Miller comments: “If this was off ered in all schools then I’m sure it would reduce the number of accidents involving people under 25.” Reducing the number of accidents involving young drivers should


www.fi rstelevenmagazine.co.uk


have a knock-on-eff ect on the cost of insuring what is, at the moment, still a high-risk group. Recently, confused.com priced the average comprehensive motor insurance policy for males aged 17 to 20 at a whopping £4,006. Premium rates for women aged 17 to 20, it said, were lower, averaging at £2,151. This discrepancy may not be the case for long, however: European court rulings coming into force from 2013 mean that insurers will be banned from imposing price variations based solely on gender. And while this might mean a fall in the cost of insurance for boys, girls can expect a price hike. Such high costs have negative eff ects on safety, resulting in uninsured drivers, or “fronting” – where a young person buys and registers a car in their own name, but tells the insurer that the parent is the main driver – the penalties of which can be severe. Young drivers are also forced into buying cheap, second-hand cars, which in turn results in more crashes. It’s a


vicious circle, but Young Marmalade,


the combined car purchase and insurance scheme for young drivers, is proving a bright alternative. Winner of the 2009 Prince Michael International Road Safety Award for its work with young drivers, Young Marmalade provides safer cars which have at least four or fi ve stars on the EuroNCAP safety rating and looks after learner drivers with an insurance policy that allows them to practice in a family car without aff ecting the insurance status or no-claims bonus of the car owner. Recently, it launched the “Intelligent Marmalade” black box system, which monitors young drivers’ acceleration, braking and cornering – thereby giving the insurers a good idea of the standard of driving. By partaking in the scheme, drivers can expect insurance premiums at roughly half the market rate – unless, that is, they are seen to be driving badly, in which case these will rise. “Intelligent Marmalade allows


young drivers to prove that they are good drivers and deserve a lower insurance premium,” says co- founder Nigel Lacy, who adds, “the vast majority of those on the scheme do drive exceptionally well.” With good parental input, lots of practice, a safer car and technology such as Intelligent Marmalade – not to mention an increased awareness of the risks associated with driving as a young person – the worries that have traditionally plagued parents as their child takes to the road may start to be


alleviated. Autumn 2011 FirstEleven 75





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