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Gap Artistic Training


Qualifi cations Education


two-week Audition Technique course which takes place during the Easter and summer vacation period. “It doesn’t guarantee students a place at drama school but it helps gain an insight into what people are looking for,” explains Sarah-Jane Chapman, head of marketing and communications at LAMDA. “It also enables you to get expert advice on what audition pieces to choose and pitfalls to avoid.” LAMDA’s One Year Foundation course


provides a more extensive preparation for entry onto a three year vocational degree programme and helps students get a clear idea of the intense training schedule that the longer course entails. “It is a tough training and a diff erent sort of experience to university,” explains Chapman. “We’re mirroring the industry and you come to the drama school because you are very serious about a career in the profession.” Which probably goes some way to explain the course’s current track record. “What we’ve found since we developed it, is that the students on the foundation course do go on to places such as LAMDA, RADA, Bristol and Central,” continues Chapman. However, anyone considering this course should bear in mind that they must fi nance the £10,430


If the right


research is done now, the benefi ts of a successful gap year could reap rewards for your degree and career


The Leap’s Cambodia Children’s Painting Project


course fee themselves. For students considering applying for a


History of Art degree, a demonstrable knowledge and love of art is essential. In fact, the course description for the History of Art course at Cambridge university recommends the following as an ideal preparation for the course: “You should visit as many museums and exhibitions as you can, taking descriptive notes of what you see. Visit buildings such as churches or country houses. […] When a work of art or architecture excites you, try to analyse why it has this eff ect. Art History Abroad encourages and enables


History of Art students in Florence


its participants to do just this. “About a third go on to read the subject at university, and it’s useful because they get to see such a wide range of stuff ,” says director Nick Ross. AHA’s six-week courses, which take place in various cities across Italy, are conducted in front of the paintings, sculpture or buildings that are being discussed. “It’s about building up a visual catalogue and putting things into context,” says Ross, who also points out that many architecture students fi nd the course useful for their studies. For those with their heart set on travelling, there are also more traditional gap year experiences available with a community arts slant – on The Leap’s Cambodia Children’s Painting Project, for example, volunteers work with street kids, encouraging them to paint and draw and then sell their work, with the proceeds split between their families and a communal education fund towards school fees.


32 FirstEleven Autumn 2011 www.fi rstelevenmagazine.co.uk


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