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HANGAR TALK At NASA Ames, Gallman


Mid-Continent Instruments Taps John Gallman to Lead True Blue Power® Division


Mid-Continent Instruments announced recently the appointment of Dr. John W. Gallman to the position of Division Director for the com- pany’s True Blue Power® divi- sion. A veteran of more than 20 years in business aviation, Gallman began his career at the NASA Ames Research Center after earning his undergraduate and masters degrees in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University, adding a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University in 1992. Prior to joining Mid- Continent Instruments, Gallman spent eight years at Cessna Aircraft Company. During his tenure at Cessna, Gallman served as the Principal Engineer for Technology Development, managing the company’s technology scouting, assessing business and technical risks, reviewing intellectual property and leading prototype demonstrations.


ROTORCRAFTPROFESSIONAL


worked with Learjet and Raytheon Aircraft, gaining valuable experience as the leader of collaborative pro- grams on aircraft conceptual design, aerodynamic shape optimization and high-speed wind tunnel testing. He later joined Raytheon Aircraft Corporation in 1996 as Manager of Preliminary Design, progressing to Program Manager and Chief Engineer on the Hawker 450 program. Gallman transitioned the Beechcraft Premier I from FAA type certification to production delivery as Chief Engineer of the program in 2001 and 2002.


“I’m pleased to be a part of the growth of the True Blue Power division at Mid- Continent Instruments,” Gallman said. “Many of the True Blue Power products have a unique focus on state-of-the- art lithium-ion batteries. Leveraging Mid-Continent’s experience in aircraft instru- ments enables easy integration of innovative power solutions into the cockpit to manage and monitor aircraft power. That foundation also provides us with an obvious platform from which to work with customers to identify their specific needs and design custom solutions,” Gallman commented. True Blue Power initially began by offering two new inverters and the MD835 Emergency Power Supply (EPS). The MD835 is the industry’s first EPS to feature A123 Systems’


Nanophosphate® lithium-ion chemistry. The breakthrough technology offers stable chem-


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istry, faster charging, consistent output, excellent cycle life and superior cost performance. True Blue Power products com- bine proven technology with the superior quality, ingenuity and decades of experience that cus- tomers have come to expect from Mid-Continent Instruments. ◆


Donaldson Receives Transport Canada Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) for Engine Inlet Filter System for AgustaWestland AW139 Helicopters


Donaldson Aerospace & Defense, a division of


Donaldson Company, Inc., has received a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) from Transport Canada (TC) for an Inlet Barrier Filter (IBF) system for the AgustaWestland AW139 helicopter. The IBF prevents engine damage in adverse and ramp environments alike, and is


also compatible with the AW139 Full Ice Protection System (FIPS). With this IBF solution, Canadian AW139 operators will experience reduced operating costs by eliminating engine damage and, at the same time, maintain operating perform- ance equivalent to basic inlet charts.


The new AW139 IBF system


features low profile conformal fore and aft fairings with dual filter assemblies mounted on the existing engine doors, creat- ing a sealed intake plenum. As with all certified Donaldson IBFs, the AW139 system includes an alternate inlet air bypass system. This emergency bypass capability is an important IBF feature and is not included in most traditional sand filters and particle separators. A sim- ple compact cockpit switch allows indication and activation of the bypass system. An integral


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