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SURVIVAL developed with the growth of the offshore oil and gas industry. Offshore


installation personnel are transported daily to and from offshore installa- tions by helicopter. In the case of the UK northern sector of the North Sea, most flights are centered on Aberdeen Airport, Europe's largest commercial heliport, serving around 500,000 helicopter passengers each year. In the past survival suits used in the UK sector of the North Sea used to confirm solely to the UK CAA Specification 19. The new suit doesn’t just comply with the new European standard of EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) it goes beyond the minimum requirements delivering exceptional in-water performance and survivability. The people wearing it as they fly back and forth to their installations need to know that it is as technological perfect as it can be. “They want to feel that they have the best protection there is. But we also know what it is like to sit on a helicopter on a long flight with a survival suit: You have heat, noise, stress and all the rest of it… So we designed this new suit knowing that the people who wear it can feel confident that they are given the best pos- sible protection whether it is been worn once or a hundred times. Our aim is to make


possible”, says Andy Wilson. “We have even taken the latest offshore


their journey as comfortable as sizing


information and carried out surveys of offshore workers, listening to their con-


cerns and reacting to their feedback. These suits are built to fit today’s offshore work population.” The outer shell of the suit is waterproof, breathable and inherently flame retardant. The thermal lining uses state-of- the-art Outlast® PCM technology for much better heat management. Outlast®


technology


was originally developed for NASA to protect astronauts from temperature fluctuations in space.


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