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semi-erect one, as there has been in breeding for colour, he would be a more popular and common- er dog to-day than is the case. He has everything to recom- mend him for a house dog. He is not too big, is smooth-coated, handsomely shaped, intelligent in expression, brilliant in colour, which being dark is less liable to show dirt and therefore in ad- vance of any white animal in a town where grimes and smuts prevail and dirt is one of the common objects of the streets.


In addition to the illegality of “cropping”, there is all the trouble and unpleasantness connected therewith, which are quite sufficient to keep such a dog from being found in almost every household. I am not alone in the opinion that this mutila- tion, continued for some many generations, has had a most injurious effect upon his health and general nature.


The black and tan, like other terriers with their ears cut, is more liable to deafness than dogs whose ears remains as na- ture made them, and so far as the first-named is concerned, I believe that his spirit is in many cases broken by the cropping process in his youth and he is never so game and smart a dogs as he would otherwise be. At least, this is my experience of black and tan terriers and other who have kept them as house dogs bear a similar opinion to that expressed here. He is now


CRITIQUE BY LT COL C.S. DEAN –President of the Black & Tan Terrier club


Well filled classes. Excellent in quality and generally uniform in type. The full eyes and indented foreheads are fast disappear- ing even at our South Country shows, at which this breed is rarely high class as some of the smaller North Country fixtures. How well the breed will fare in the face of the abolition of crop- ping is not easy to predict, but so far the attempt to breed good Black & Tans and good drop


a purely fancy dog, i.e., he is not used as an assistant to the game- keeper or to destroy vermin, fox- es and such-like creatures. He may kill rabbits, indeed he can be trained until he is quite adept at the first-named rude branch of sport, but his tender ears are against his going to ground and hunting in the coverts and cop- pices, as he would do in his nat- ural condition.


EAR CROPPING (‘Our Dogs’ 1897)


ears at the same time has been a failure. There is no breed prob- ably more difficult to produce as approaching the Standard of Excellence laid down by the sev- eral clubs devoted to the breed, than that of the Manchester Ter- rier.


In most breeds colour is of sec- ondary importance. In a Black & Tan it is a primary requisite. In addition to this there are the markings and pencillings which are held sacred by some experts. Shape and symmetry is of more importance in a prize Man- chester. It is no doubt to these relative difficulties and disad- vantages that we must look for the slow progress of Manchester Terrier popularity. No natural ear compares to the alert crop.


British Dogs: Their Points, Selection and Show Preparation (1903)


The Black-


And-Tan Terrier By William Drury


A point on which great stress was laid until recently was the cut- ting of the ears, and unless this was what was called artistically done there was no chance of an otherwise first-rate dog winning. This custom of cropping Ter- riers’ ears was strongly depre- cated by the late Mr. Dalziel and others, and no valid argument in its favour could be offered by the supporters of the practice.


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