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The operation is not usually done till the puppy is six or sev- en months old, as until that time it is almost impossible to get the desired shape, and this makes it all the more painful as by that time the cartilages have become hard and a sharp pair of scissors must be used with considerable force to put through them.


The natural ear is thin in well- bred dogs and falls over out- wards, but seldom lies quite close to the cheeks, often ex- hibiting tendency to the rose or tulip form, and the two ears seldom matching exactly. It is a great deal on this account, I think, that the practice of crop- ping is kept up for very few dogs would show neat ears if left en- tire ; but when they are neat, they surely ought to be prized accordingly by the judges.


The Cultivator &


Country Gentleman (1889) The Kennel: The Black and Tan Terrier


By: Stephen Beale (England)


It was customary, formerly, to crop all the black-and-tan ter- riers, and it has only been very recently than an uncropped dog has had any chance of a prize in the show ring. There have al- ways been those breeders who were In opposition to the prac- tice, for which no excuse could


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glect of the carriage of the ears in selecting dogs for breeding, and the result is that many other- wise good dogs would undoubt- edly be spoiled by their ears if cropping was abolished. This is the secret of the opposition to the abolition of the system. But the advocates are determined to carry their point, sooner or later, and have shown their ear- nestness in this matter by pro- viding a cup, valued at £25, for uncropped black-and-tan terri- ers. They are also carrying the war into other breeds which are also shown cropptd, and we may


be offered, save that of fashion. It could not be even claimed that a cropped dog was better look- ing than one with well-carried ears, and thus no possible plea could be offered for the cruel practice, for cruel it undoubt- edly is. At last, the club formed in the interests of the breed took the matter up, and has since that time been endeavouring to induce breeders and exhibitors to abandon cropping. Thus far, however, the effort has not met with much success. The fact is that cropping has induced a ne-


hope that ere long this senseless and cruel practice may be done away with al together


Outing Magazine


(1889) At a recent meeting of the Black and Tan Terrier Club, of Eng- land, the rule of the club pro- hibiting dogs that have been cropped from competing for a club prize, was strongly ap- proved, and the hope was ex- pressed that the committee of the Kennel Club will shortly see their way to issue their edict against the practice of cropping.


A History of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain and Ireland (1894)


‘The Terriers’ By Rawdon Lee


With his rich red-tan markings, deep black colour, pencilled toes, and thumb marks on the feet, elegant shape, sprightly appearance, and general game- ness, he is no doubt a dog that might have had a popular future in store. But the fates decreed otherwise, and fashion sug- gested that he would look better with a portion of his ears cut off, and man carried out the need- less mutilation...


I am of the opinion that had as much care been used in produc- ing on the black and tan terrier a small thin drop ear, or a neat


BLACK & TAN | FALL 2010


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