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The Dog: In Health and Disease (1885) The Smooth


English Terriers By John Walsh


There is this practical evil too in cropping, that it places the dog with naturally defective ears on an equality in competition with the dog born with perfect ears if they have been equally skilfully manipulated. The natural ear is of three kinds—the button or drop ear, like the fox terrier; the rose ear, that is half folded back, so that the interior of the ear can be partially seen; and the prick or tulip ear. But I have never seen the last-named kind, except in coarse specimens. The leather of the ear is thin, and generally finest in the best bred dogs.


The Country (1876) A Class for Terriers with


Uncut Ears Could you find a corner in your journal for my appeal for the above, viz., an extra class for


black and tans with their ears uncut, and no Manchester terri- ers in this class as they appear to me to be a distinct breed? Usu- ally there are two classes, first for toys under 5 lb. And then one for those of 12 lb. Or 14 lb. Who, with their eyes open, would enter a dog under 7 lb. Against a 14-pounder? What, I ask, is a class between the two – say, under 7 lb. Or 8 lb. – and that the authorities should an- nounce publically what kind of dogs would be considered bro- ken-haired toy terriers?


Alfred Winfield


[We are strongly in favour of classes for uncut dogs, but it is almost impossible to change a “fashion.” This class, as well as one for fox terriers with uncut tails, proved a failure at Not- tingham show. – Ed.]


The ears are almost invariably cropped, and that in a way to cause great pain to the dog, not only at the time but for many weeks afterwards. In order to give a very sharp appearance, the “leather” is cut away almost level with the head, leaving a thin point standing up in a man- ner quite unnatural to the ani- mal in any of his varieties. To do this requires a very good eye and some practice, but, however well the operation is done, the wound will contract and pucker the slip left if daily attention is not paid to it by removing the scabs and stretching out the puckers ; the sharp point shrinks into an un- sightly crumpled lump, and in- stead of an appearance of being presented of greater sharpness than before, the opposite is ac- complished.


Hopes have been entertained of late years that this practice of cropping would be abandoned in the case of these terriers as has been done with the pug, but I see no indications of such a happy result; and undoubtedly a Manchester terrier, however well made and marked would be left out of the prize list if exhibited with his ears entire.


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