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NOT ONLY DID THIS HELICOPTER

PLAY A GROUND BREAKING ROLE IN COMMERCIAL HELICOPTER OPERA- TIONS AS THE MODEL 47, BUT IT ALSO WOULD PLAY A MONUMENTAL ROLE IN CHANGING BATTLEFIELD OPERATIONS AS THE U.S. ARMY’S H-13 SIOUX.

build a theoretical, scientific model that is capable of integrating what is known about physical and meta- physical realities (Young, 2004).

After moving to

California, the Youngs also founded the Institute for the Study of Consciousness, which was intended to be an educational branch of the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness. Arthur Young taught, wrote and continued to study and develop connections between the physical and nonphysical sciences up until his death in 1995 at the age of 89. Over 5,800 military and civilian variants of the Bell Model 47 were produced in a production run that lasted over 27 years and ended in the United States in 1974, although it continued in other coun- tries until the late 1970s (Spencer, 1998). Not only did this helicopter play a ground breaking role in commercial helicopter operations as the Model 47, but it also would play a monumental role in changing battlefield operations as the U.S. Army’s H-13 Sioux. The H-13 saved countless lives in the Korean War as it pioneered combat medevac operations and is now well known as the MASH Helicopter from the television show of the same name. Even after he left Bell Aircraft, Arthur Young’s engineering influence extended well beyond the highly successful Model 47. The Bell UH-1 Huey and Bell 206 Jet Ranger were introduced in the late 1950s and early 1960s and would become arguably the most popular military and commercial helicopter models ever produced. Both of these models had design characteristics that could be traced back to Arthur Young and his small team from Gardenville. In fact several of Young’s early team members continued on with Bell Aircraft for a number of years. One such person was Bart Kelley, who was a childhood friend of Arthur Young and worked with him on his early model experiments in Pennsylvania and later on the Bell Model 30 project. Kelley didn’t retire from Bell until 1974 at which time he was the senior vice-president of engineering (Tipton, n.d.). Arthur Young’s engineering ability Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52