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became the third successful American helicopter when it flew untethered on June 26, 1943 (Spenser, 1998). The third Model 30 prototype combined the best fea- tures of its two predecessors. It so impressed Larry Bell that he gave the go ahead to proceed with a pro- duction prototype, which would become the Bell Model 47. With the war manufacturing of fixed wing aircraft declining and the team from Gardenville outgrowing the old car dealership, Arthur Young and his team moved to the main Bell Plant at the Niagara Falls Airport in the summer of 1945. The first Bell Model 47 was completed on December 8, 1945. It had an open frame tail boom and bub- ble canopy, both of which were

design features

incorporated by Arthur Young to save weight and provide some relief from the elements for the pilot. The Model 47 was intend- ed to be a commercial hel-

icopter and as such Larry Bell was anxious to get it cer- tified for production. The Civil Aeronautics Authority had never certified a helicopter before, so in order to do this they had to create a new certification process. On March 8, 1946 the Bell Model 47 received the first commercial license ever awarded to a helicopter. This was followed by receiving Approved

Type Certificate (Helicopter) Number One on May 8, 1946 (Spenser, 1998).

Despite the fact that the success of the Model 47 was just beginning, Arthur Young left the Bell Aircraft Corporation in October of 1947. He had accom- plished what he had set out to do and that was to use the problem of developing a working helicopter as an opportunity to examine how science and engineer- ing could be combined with the human thought process to conquer com- plex problems once thought unsolvable. Arthur Young depart- ed Bell on good terms and continued on in a small role as an occasional advi- sor to the company, from time to time getting involved in solving prob- lems associated with heli- copter flight. He returned to Pennsylvania and vigor- ously pursued astrology, cosmology and philosophy and expanded his under-

standing of both the real and surreal world. Through these pursuits he eventually developed his Theory of Process, which incorporated widely accepted facts of physical science with psychology, spirituality and con- sciousness. In 1951 Arthur Young and his second wife Ruth established the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness. The goal of the foundation was to Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52