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Up Front While Letterman’s show welcomed


show business A-listers, there were other elements that kept viewers coming back night after night. Stupid pet tricks. Small-town news. Countless cameos by Tony Randall and, after Randall died, by Regis Philbin. And, of course, the top-10 list. The kid in Letterman never stopped


loving to throw things and break things, and that led to numerous appearances on the program by bowling superstars Dick Weber and Mike Aulby, along with


other bits involving bowling balls used as weapons of minor and controlled destruction. In honor of Letterman’s retirement,


Bowlers Journal Interactive presents its own “top” list of Letterman show bowling moments. We couldn’t quite get to 10, but then, we think Dave probably would appreciate that lack of symmetry. So… here we go with the top 7


bowling moments on David Letterman’s late-night programs…


TOUCH FOR VIDEO


NUMBER 6 A bowling ball is dropped from seven floors up into a bathtub of chocolate pudding.


TOUCH FOR VIDEO


NUMBER 5 “Bob Borden’s Bowling Ball Demo” involves bowling balls being thrown out of a window to destroy a car.


EVERYTHING BOWLING, ALL THE TIME


TOUCH FOR VIDEO


NUMBER 7 In early November 2014, Letterman starts to introduce his top-10 list on why bowling’s U.S. Open had been canceled for the second straight year, then goes off on a tangent in which he mentions Chris Schenkel, Billy Welu, Johnny Petraglia, Dick Weber, Don Carter, Earl Anthony and Norm Duke.


NUMBER 4 In September 1989, Mike Aulby does some bowling in a hallway adjacent to the show’s stage. After he knocks down pins for a few frames, the targets are changed to Budweiser beer bottles, pitchers of Kool-Aid, bottles of ketchup and Ming vases.


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