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PBA Xtra E.J. Tackett Andres Gomez


TACKETT AND GOMEZ


THE ART OF FORGETTING


Gomez, Tackett learn that the best place to leave professional setbacks is where they belong: the past.


F


BOWLING BLUES: Tackett (left), the 2013 PBA Rookie of the Year, has bowled poor- ly on TV, including a 145 in the title match of the 2014 Oklahoma Open against Jason Belmonte. Gomez, meanwhile, averaged seven pins fewer in 2014 (213) than he did in a 2011-12 season in which he averaged 220, made three shows, and won a title.


ailure often is touted as a champion’s greatest tutor. Those who do great things first learned to fail just as greatly, the TED-talk style wisdom goes. Speak with those who have seized their


dreams, however, and a more specific message emerges: There is plenty to learn from failure, but there is more to gain from forgetting. ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// “The mind always re-


Gomez won his third


minds you how long it has been since you won; it reminds you how bad you bowled at a certain event,” says Andres Gomez. ‘You always try to put it behind you, and say, The next tour- nament will be better.’ And when that doesn’t happen, you keep moving forward.”


PBA Tour title at the Xtra Frame Pensacola South Open on June 21 after a two-year winless streak. His win at New Liberty Lanes in Pensacola, Fla., came amid a comeback from a 2014 campaign in which he averaged 213 over 13 events, seven pins fewer


than the 220 average he logged over 14 tourna- ments in a 2011-12 season that saw him make three shows and win the Carmen Salvino Classic. He already has made more stepladder finals on the PBA Tour this season than he had in the last two combined. For E.J. Tackett, who


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