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Discovering Novel Treatments BLOCKING INFLAMMATION


Discovering how to prevent the inflammation that results in severe pain, diarrhea, and other debilitating symptoms.


Researcher Institution Dr. Alan Lomax Queen’s University Project


Dr. Lomax is examining how the sympathetic nervous system, a particular branch of the nervous system,


can regulate the immune system and change the severity of inflammation. This work will determine whether targeting the sympathetic nervous system is a viable treatment option for IBD.


Keywords: neuroimmunology; sympathetic nervous system; immune regulation.


Dr. Frank Jirik


University of Calgary


All humans carry a prion protein, which has protective effects in various cell and tissue types. Dr. Jirik is


examining the nature of the protective and anti-inflammatory properties of this protein. This study may possibly reveal new targets for drug development that will be able to mimic the striking protective qualities of the prion protein during intestinal inflammation.


Keywords: colitis; ileitis; endogenous prion protein; macrophages; anti-inflammatory.


Dr. Derek McKay University of Calgary


Dr. McKay is examining patient tissue samples to determine whether bone-marrow derived activated


macrophages (AAMs) can be used as a novel treatment for intestinal inflammation. If possible, this could be a novel and safe approach to treat and perhaps ultimately cure IBD.


Keywords: anti-inflammatory macrophages; adoptive transfer treatment strategy; bone marrow


Dr. Waliul Khan McMaster University


Dr. Khan is examining what role a hormone called serotonin plays in regulating an immune response.


This may lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat gut inflammatory disorders, including IBD.


Keywords: serotonin; hormone therapy; immune regulation.


. $119,254 (Year 3 of 3) $119,445 (Year 2 of 3) $118,850 (Year 2 of 3) Investment $119,445 (Year 2 of 3)


RESEARCH REPORT 2013 | 16


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