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Discover Dominica Authority: c/o Brighter Group: The Pod, London’s Vertical Gateway, Bridges Wharf, Battersea, London SW11 3BE T: 020 7326 9880 E: Dominica@brightergroup.com DiscoverDominica @nature_island


discoverdominica DOMINICA


THE ONLY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD TO HAVE A RESIDENT POPULATION OF SPERM WHALES


D


ominica (pronounced Dom-in- EEK-a, and not to be confused


with the Dominican Republic), is a paradise for adventure travellers and nature lovers. This unique destination offers whale and dolphin watching, hiking, canyoning, diving and water sports as well as cultural events and festivals. Rated as one of the world’s top 10 dive locations, Dominica offers a range of dive sites including the aptly named Champagne Reef.


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Size: 29 miles by 16 miles Currency: East Caribbean dollar Population: 71,293 (2011) Capital (Main City): Roseau Local Beer: Kubuli Dish of the Day: Broth, a hearty one-pot meal with fish, smoked meat or chicken, ground provisions (often cassava) and dumplings


The reef gets its name from the continuous flow of tiny bubbles that emerge from the vast system of active fumaroles on the sea floor. Known as the whale watching capital of the Caribbean, Dominica is home to 20 species of whales and dolphins, including sperm whales. Dominica is the only country in the world where sperm whales reside all year round. Spotting Dominica’s resident sperm whales is not the only activity that sets this Caribbean island apart from its counterparts as it is also boasts the Caribbean’s longest walking trail – the Waitukubuli National Trail which extends the length of the island.


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Dominica is also home to the last indigenous tribe in the Caribbean islands – the Kalinago Indians. Come to Dominica and discover the beauty and adventure of the Nature Island.


KEY EVENT World Creole Music Festival: October 24-26 2014


This is the key event in Dominica’s calendar hosted by some of the most famous names in Creole wcmfdominica.com


A perfect day on Dominica begins at the Kalinago Barana Aute where visitors can tour a model Kalinago village. Visitors experience a herbal medicine garden, hiking trails, scenic view points, the Crayfish River and Isulukati Falls. Kalinago artisans display canoe building, weaving baskets and creating authentic crafts. Next is a hike to Trafalgar Falls, the Nature Island’s famous twin waterfalls that tumble into refreshing pools below. Visitors can cool off in the smaller waterfall or seek out the taller fall’s hot springs for a natural spa bath. Complete your day in one of the island’s many ‘bubbling pots’ and hot water pools, such as the village of Wotten Waven. Screw’s Sulphur Spa has pools where visitors can relax in the natural hot waters after a day of exhausting adventure. Ahhhhh...


Grenada Tourism Authority: T: 020 8328 0644 E: grenada@eyes2market.co.uk W: grenadagrenadines.com discovergrenada


@discovergrenada


puregrenada GRENADA


PURE GRENADA, THE SPICE ISLAND, BOASTS AN UNDERWATER SCULPTURE PARK AND THE WARMEST WELCOME IN THE CARIBBEAN


G


renada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique are authentic


Caribbean islands that offer visitors romantic, active and natural holidays. From sandy beaches to spice


plantations, coral reefs to rainforests, the islands abound with interesting places to visit and fascinating people to meet. Food is always fresh and there are plenty of eating places to choose from. Time spent in Grenada is always memorable: whether it’s seeing chocolate go from bean to bar,


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Size: 133 sq miles Currency: East Caribbean dollar Population: 109,000 Main City: St George’s Local Beer: Carib Dish of the Day: Oil Down – a one-pot dish of breadfruit, dumplings, salted meat and vegetables stewed in coconut milk


tasting local rum at a distillery powered by a waterwheel, yoga in a rainforest or admiring the leatherback turtles nesting on a beach, there are plenty of moments to thrill and inspire. Snorkel over the world’s first Underwater Sculpture Park – named by National Geographic magazine as one of the world’s top 25 wonders – and dive at over 50 sites to discover reefs and wrecks. On the water is just as exhilarating:


Grenada and Carriacou are renowned for their world-class regattas. And did we mention that the islands have more than 40 stunning white sand beaches? We


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are proud that Grenada’s hotels and resorts are owned and managed by Caribbean nationals, which means that visitors are assured of finding a very warm Grenadian welcome awaits them.


KEY EVENT


Grenada Sailing Festival: January 29-February 3, 2015 A distinctly Caribbean regatta attracting sailors from around the world grenadasailingfestival.com


The first thing I do when I arrive is take a few lungfuls of the fresh air: you can smell the spices in the breeze and for me, that says ‘home’. I head back to the parish where my family lives and within no time I’m back into the rhythm of Grenadian life. After a stop at the Spice Market in St George’s – where everything is so fresh – I’ll enjoy a walk along the bustling Carenage waterfront before a seafood lunch. Later, it’s a short drive into the rainforest for a walk to one of the waterfalls and then back to the beach for a swim with the family as the sun sets. All of which gives me plenty of inspiration for my charity work, my writing and making the most of being with my loved ones. Johnson Beharry, VC. Founder, JBVC Foundation.


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WWW.CARIBBEAN.CO.UK LovetheCaribbean


@_LoveCaribbean


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