This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
green | news GREEN FINGERS BA to use fuel made from converted waste


BRITISH AIRWAYS IS looking to improve its environmental credentials by investing in a facility that converts landfill waste into jet fuel — the first project of its kind worldwide. According to the airline, the GreenSky


London facility will be able to convert 575,000 tonnes (633,828 tons) of waste into 120,000 tonnes (132,277 tons) of clean-burning liquid fuel annually. Tis waste would otherwise be destined for landfill or incineration. BA has made a long-term commitment to purchase 50,000 tonnes (55,115 tons) of jet fuel produced at the processing facility each year for the next 11 years. Te carrier is working in partnership with


Solena Fuels, which will develop the facility at the UK’s Tames Enterprise Park in Turrock, Essex. According to the airline, the project is due to be completed in 2017. Willie Walsh, CEO of BA’s parent company


International Airlines Group (IAG), said: “We are always striving to reduce our impact on climate change and this first-of-its-kind project marks a significant step for the aviation industry. Construction of the GreenSky London fuel facility at Tames Enterprise Park will lay the foundations for British Airways to reduce its carbon emissions significantly.” He added: “Te sustainable jet fuel produced


each year will be enough to power our flights from London City Airport twice over, with carbon savings the equivalent of taking 150,000 cars off the road.” Te revolutionary fuel project will apply high temperature plasma gasification technology to turn the waste into synthetic gas and then into liquid hydrocarbons.


NEWSINBRIEF


n GREEN COMPARISON: A new hotel booking website has launched to encourage more people to stay in eco-friendly hotels. BookDifferent.com claims it’s the first site that allows users to compare different accredited eco-friendly hotels, with properties featuring awards from Green Tourism, Travelife, Green Key, Green Globe and Nordic Swan. bookdifferent.com


n PAPER FREE: Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts is scrapping newspapers and switching to digital media in a bid to become more eco-friendly and contribute to sustainable operations. The group offers around two million papers a year to guests, but a new app gives them access to more than 2,000 local and international publications via a laptop, tablet or smartphone. shangri-la.com


n ANIMAL RIGHTS: A ban on the use of orca whales for entertainment at SeaWorld is being proposed by a California state legislator. The move follows the controversial CNN documentary Blackfish, which recounts the 2010 death of a SeaWorld trainer by an orca whale in Orlando. No date has been set for a vote on the bill. seaworldparks.com


The GreenSky London facility will be able to convert 575,000 tonnes of waste into 120,000 tonnes of clean-burning liquid fuel annually


Robert Do, Solena Fuels’ president and chief


executive, said: “We are excited to help BA achieve its sustainability goals by providing an innovative solution to produce drop-in jet fuel. We anticipate starting construction of the site in approximately 12 months after all the requisite permits and agreements have been obtained.”


British Airways is not the first airline to make


a public declaration about sustainable fuel. Virgin Atlantic has partnered with LanzaTech to work on developing a low-carbon aviation fuel and in October 2013, the carrier said it could become ‘a commercial reality within the next couple of years’. ba.com


summer 2014 | ASTAnetwork | 33


WORDS: CHRIS PEACOCK. IMAGE: ALAMY


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140