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MAP: JOHN PLUMER. IMAGE: GETTY


departures | city break


CULTURE


 PUSHKIN MUSEUM: With half a million works over three buildings, the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts is a Moscow institution. There’s an excellent Impressionist exhibit, including Sergei Shchukin’s Monet collection. Until July 27, a temporary exhibition focuses on Renaissance painters from Bergamo, Italy. arts-museum.ru  LENIN’S TOMB: It’s one of the world’s oddest cultural attractions, but Lenin’s embalmed body in the Red Square mausoleum, which reopened last year after renovations, is a must-see — this year marks the 90th anniversary of his death. Be prepared to wait in line, especially at weekends.  UNDERGROUND ART: Moscow’s exquisite metro stations are works of art in themselves. The art deco, mosaic-roofed Mayakovskaya station is beautiful; Komsomolskaya combines baroque design with a Lenin theme; and Stalin’s favorite stop, Ploshchad Revolyutsii, contains 80 life-size bronze sculptures of idealized Soviet citizens.


Komsomolskaya Station


EVENTS


 FOLKLORE FESTIVAL: Moscow International Folklore Festival (September 5-9) brings together artisans from all over the world. Expect performances and stalls selling everything from traditional Russian rag dolls to birch bark rattles.  IVAN KUPALO: A combination of pagan and Christian ritual, Ivan Kupalo, or St John the Baptist’s Day, takes place July 6, with dancing, lantern rituals and bonfi res in the city’s parks.  SUMMER BALLET: In high summer, from July 1 through August 28 (during the Bolshoi’s seasonal break), the annual Summer Ballet Seasons stages classic dance performances by leading companies, including Moscow City Ballet and the Russian National Ballet.


WHERE TO SHOP


 GUM: Communism has given way to consumerism in today’s Moscow, with upscale boutiques wherever you look. GUM, opposite Lenin’s mausoleum, is a grand old mall housing the likes of Hermes and Louis Vuitton — its 19th-century glass-roofed corridors are worth a wander, even for window shoppers. gum.ru  ELISEEVSKY: Chandeliers, marble columns and stuccoed ceilings are par for the course at the city’s most extravagant grocery store, Eliseevsky, which has been keeping Moscow’s elite fed and watered since 1901. It sells everything from bread to borscht, and fancy


cakes to salted cucumbers — don’t miss the traditional hand-made chocolate. eliseevskiy.ru  ISMAILOVO: At weekends, it’s time to hit Ismailovo Market, a wildly popular fl ea market north-east of the city center. Rows of neat wooden booths are piled high with antiques, clothes, Soviet memorabilia and quirky souvenirs.  TSVETNOY: A modern mall for the young and beautiful, Tsvetnoy Central Market, near the Trubnaya metro stop, brings together everyday and high-end brands and mixes in contemporary Russian designers such as Aleksander Terekhov, A La Russe and Andrey Artyomov. tsvetnoy.com


FACTS


 WHEN TO GO: With its sub-zero winters and slushy springs, summer is the most popular time to visit Moscow. Many Muscovites escape to the countryside during August, meaning the city is emptier; however, many theaters and cultural centers are closed.  TIME: GMT +4.  DIALING CODE: +7.  CONTACT: Russian National Tourist Offi ce. russia-travel.com


122 | ASTAnetwork | summer 2014


Mikhail Bulgakov Museum


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Tsvetnoy Central Market


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Ismailovo Market 3 miles


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