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details DESIGN


Designing With Tooling in Mind Saves Time, Weight, Cost


JITEN SHAH, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & ANALYSIS, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS CASTING PROFILE


Cast Component: Transmis- sion main housing for hybrid vehicle.


Material: XK360 aluminum. Weight: 52 lbs. Dimensions: 15 x 13 x 14.25 in.


Process: High pressure diecasting. Application: Automotive.


Generous fi llets and corners in heat sink fi ns improve manufacturability.


A sound casting is critical to the structural integrity of heat sink fi ns.


• Any shrinkage or porosity in the casting will act as an insulator. Using casting process simulation, die cooling (for heavy sections) and heating channels (for thin sections) can be optimized for better thermal balance, which will assure sound castings.


• Sharp radii will cause the casting to stick to the die, making ejection diffi cult and leading to distortion. On the other hand, heavier sections will extend the die cycle time and increase the cost.


M


ercury Marine, Fond du Lac, Wis., provided end-user Fisker Automotive with time, weight and cost savings over sand casting with a diecast aluminum transmission main housing. Diecast aluminum off ers higher strength to weight ratio, more rigidity, ductility and durability, higher heat conductivity and


capacity for heat sink applications over engineered plastic, and higher strength, better dimensional accuracy, surface fi nish and near net shaped features over sand castings. It is ideal for large volumes due to high tooling costs. Read more about diecasting design in the feature, “Freedom Within Bounds,” on p. 30.


16 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | Nov/Dec 2013


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