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Prevention By Mark Robins, Senior Editor


MCN: Is there a difference in the impact between roofs and walls?


Lynn: Since walls and roofs are in different planes of a building, depending on the shape of the panel


Stermer: The effect on wall applications is greater because of greater visibility. Oil canning on the roof is commonly overlooked while oil canning on walls is more noticeable.


Tuschall: Generally no, unless a metal roof is not installed properly with expansion consider- ations then severe oil canning could tear open a joint and cause leakage.


MCN: What causes oil canning?


at each application and the season or time of day when the sun creates shallow cross lighting on the surfaces, each wall and roof can appear differently.


Parvin: In most cases, oil canning is more dis- cernible on sloped roofs when viewed from a low angle, with the sun across the surface, the wavi- ness of oil canning in highlighted. Colors of dark greens, browns and natural material, such as zinc, copper and stainless, depending on pan width, will show oil canning more. Walls, if using fl at material in lighter gauges, will also show oil canning.


Hance: Low-slope roofs have a minimal impact from oil canning, as they are less likely to be seen.


Parvin: Lack of tension leveling of product. Poorly adjusted or warn rollforming equipment. Uneven substrate. Width and spacing of seam. Attachment of panel system that restricts product naturally tendency to expand and contract. Sheen, fi nish and color. Quality of product. Material thick- ness of product.


Lynn: Oil canning originates at the time of manu- facture of the coil sheet because of mill camber and leveling tolerances. Oil canning can be caused by a number of factors: residual stresses induced during coil production, slitting and forming of the metal panels during fabrication, and misalignment of the support system, over-engagement of the panels, overdriving of the fasteners, and move- ment of the primary structure and handling of the panels during installation.


Stermer: Oil canning is an elastic buckling phenomena by material subjected to compres-


James C. Tuschall, president, Tuschall Engineering Co. Inc., Burr Ridge, Ill.


Gary Lynn, senior associate, senior architect–QA/QC manager, LEO A DALY, Omaha, Neb.


www.metalconstructionnews.com


Arthur E. Hance, president, Hance Construction Inc., Washington, N.J.


Glenn Parvin, president, CASS Sheetmetal Inc., Detroit


David Stermer, PE, director of engineering, Metal Sales Manufacturing Corp., Louisville, Ky.


May 2013


METAL CONSTRUCTION NEWS 35


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