This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BARBICAN LIFE


impoverishment. The longer you scythe a piece of ground, the better the area becomes : thistles and docks give way to grasses and wildflowers. So watch that space !


Seeds fall during the scything and small areas of bare soil open up to encourage germination. At the same time, there is less


compacting/disturbance of soil. Soil undisturbed for long periods of time means wildlife have a chance to get established.


Hauling away the results of the scything


Gardens, of how best to maintain and improve our wildflower meadow, the unanimous consensus was that scything is the best way to do this. As mentioned earlier, our long term objective is to impoverish the soil as wild flowers thrive on impoverished soils. Scything one or two times a year encourages


biodiversity and allows a range of wild flowers to become established in a meadow.


Garden mowers especially strimmers are not very suitable for cutting and raking as they chop up the grasses too finely to enable effective removal of clippings and therefore their nutrients, thus slowing the process of


Highlights as volunteers? Discovering the range of plants that grow in the garden - observing them throughout the year. Watching the insects and birds feed off these plants and seeing how they use the shrubs, trees and plants for homes and shelter and to protect and raise their young. This year we are continuing to work on all the habitats in the garden - pond, cottage garden, wildflower meadow, and the wooded areas. The area in front of Tudor Rose is being redesigned - to make it more butterfly and bee friendly. So please come and enjoy your wildlife garden!


8


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56