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FEATURE


ladies, I saw it had been a friend request from another guest on our table. During the speeches? I accepted out of curiosity and sadly was not astounded by her most recent update: “Wedding gone. Speeches going. Dancing? Bring it on.” (T is update has been grammatically modifi ed!)


In her book ‘Alone Together’ Sherry Turkle suggests that, “we’d rather text than talk,” (incidentally I had tried and failed on numerous occasions to converse with the aforementioned guest; I can only conclude that she discovered my name from my place setting). Turkle goes on to advise that our relationship with technology is still in its infancy and is one that needs nurturing and understanding


± although I’m not sure about her take on basic manners!


now report that up to 40% of their patients are presenting with stress related injuries such as chronic neck pain and headaches.


T e problem is that whilst it might seem harmless to see what one friend is up to on holiday and what another is doing with their children, it can make you feel inadequate in your own choices leading to the most damaging symptom of all: the underlying stress that we feel whilst trying to have it all and not quite managing it.





Journalist Hephzibah Anderson explains that, “Choice is an inherently stressful luxury, especially in a culture that suggests it’s possible to have it all.” T e idea of having to choose and being able to have it all seem at odds with one another and this is the cause of the problem. Should you choose to stay in and take a break from bagging the job, the man and the life you want?


If you do go out which of these should take priority? Too much choice, as they say, is a fi ne headache and physiotherapists


So could you be suff ering from FOMO? Make a mental list of things you are worried about. What did you choose? Making sure you have some quality time for yourself? How your best mate’s date went last night? If you have been cooped up in the house too long? If you did you are in the minority. Most people choose to worry about money, to-do lists and


T e idea of having to CHOOSE and being able to have it all seem at odds with one another and this is the CAUSE OF THE


PROBLEM. Should you choose to stay in and take a break from BAGGING THE


JOB, the man and the life you want?


the plan (you know what everyone else the same age as you is already doing that you’re not).


Of course I’m not ± ±


belittling any worries especially with the economic climate the way it is. But


isn’t that all the more reason to focus a bit more on the social climate (and I don’t mean by reading


your wall posts on a more regular basis).


In America the


Sabbath Manifesto organise a national day of unplugging (this year sundown to sundown on 1-2 March). T ey advocate avoiding


technology; connecting with friends and family; focusing on health and getting outside, as part of their key principles. It may sound a bit hippy or have you clinging onto your smartphone in desperation but I think they’ve got the right idea.


How many parents limit their children’s time on games consoles, watching television or surfi ng the internet? Yet do we regulate our own use of technology so vigorously? How many times have you checked your emails/social network today? Compare this to the number of meaningful conversations you have had.


SO WHAT IS THE CURE FOR THE FOMO EPIDEMIC?


I would certainly invest in the eye cream that erases a late night and the meal that will cure my hangover. T en again, until I take the time to enjoy the causes of the swollen eyes and pounding headache they are all that remain (along with an embarrassing glut of mobile uploads) in my life; one that I fear I might be missing out on. Eleanor Roosevelt said that, “T e purpose of life is to live it, to taste experience to the utmost, to reach out eagerly and without fear…”


So instead of spending all day chasing your tail and checking your emails get out of the cyber world and into the real world.


www.r-magazine.co.uk 99





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